Posts Tagged ‘VimWiki’

2012w38

Sunday, September 23rd, 2012

Patent / Copyright madness

Automated copyright enforcement really seems to work well… NOT!

And Apple is up to no good as usual…

Patent trolls trolling around, but it would seem not without a fight :)

Oh, and if you were thinking of setting up a service which required a login, and you thought you’d protect people’s accounts well, then that might be patented…

Programming

Through this reddit thread (referencing it both for source and because the comments in there are relevant) I was lead to this post sometime this week or last.

And this weekend, while doing the weekly write-up, I re-read the post, and started thinking, because I kindof feel that my own hobby projects very easily fall victim to this. They get shot down because I start thinking of how much stuff I would have to rewrite (things I’ve already solved in previous projects, but never put down the time to make generic enough to reuse) or figure out, and it just takes my edge off wanting to sit down and do it.

But then it struck me, what help me get reinvigorated, what helps me come over at least that hurdle: A moderately quiet place, time enough for a conversation, a good (programmer) friend, and optionally a beer.

Broken gets fixed. Shoddy lasts forever — I wonder, does this mean that, if something is shoddy and you want it fixed, the correct action is to break it? ;)

git

I found myself wanting a way to have a central repository react to pushes based on what branch was pushed (I am working on a script at work, which some of my colleagues are beta-testing for me).

Whilst I develop a new feature I need a way to push that potentially buggy version of the script to a path where the testers can find it, while using a completely different path for the stable version which everyone else could use without any big risk of it messing anything up.

What I ended up with was this:

#!/bin/sh

read _from _to _branchPath
_branch=`basename $_branchPath`

if [ "$_branch" == "develop" ];
then
    cd /path/to/local/repository/on/server
    unset GIT_DIR
    git pull
    git checkout develop
    cp -f ./scriptname /path/to/beta/test/directory/
fi

Two questions on Stack Overflow helped me out tremendously: This and this (and as always, pesa was a big help too)

And since I agree with this post (namely that vimdiff would be a great diff viewer for git) I went ahead and followed the instructions of that post :)

vim

Using vimwiki to track time sounds brilliant. It’s almost enticing enough for me to look into vimscripting to help out. Yet another project I’d like to spend time on :S

Being that paranoid soul I am, and now that I can also call myself a tester, I realize I’ve become even more aware of how many different entry points there are which needs to secured, such as vim’s modelines (protip: use secure modelines

From this post I learnt about license-loader, which I need to look into.

awk

I found this post to be an excellent intro to awk, I am going to spread this around whenever I need to show anyone the basics :)

Misc

This post about 52Hz made me kindof sad :/

On the other hand, this post filled me with some hope.

I think it could be beneficial if this site was more widely distributed, so here’s me doing my part.

Finally, this post was pretty cool, and I immediately thought of at least two people I know who would get a kick out of reading this. :)

:wq

My Software Stack 2011 edition

Saturday, December 31st, 2011

I realize that I haven’t written my customary “software stack” post for this year yet. But hey, from where I’m sitting, I still have … 36 minutes to spare ;)

I’ll be using the same categories as last year; system, communications, web, development, office suite, server, organization, and entertainment.

System

The OS of choice is still Archlinux, my window manager is still wmii, my terminal emulator is rxvt-unicode, upgraded by also installing urxvt-tabbedex.

My shell is still bash, my cron daemon is still fcron, and my network manager is wicd.

To this configuration I’ve added the terminal multiplexer tmux, and have lately found out just how useful mc can be. Oh, and qmv from the renameutils package is now a given part of the stack.

Communications

Not much change here, Thunderbird for email, Pidgin for instant messaging, irssi for IRC.

Heybuddy has been replaced by identicurse as my micro-blogging (identi.ca) client. Heybuddy is very nice, but I can use identicurse from the commandline, and it has vim-like bindings.

For Pidgin I use OTR to encrypt conversations. For Thunderbird I use the enigmail addon along with GnuPG.

This means that Thunderbird still hasn’t been replaced by the “mutt-stack” (mutt, msmtp, offlineimap and mairix) and this is mostly due to me not having the energy to learn how to configure mutt.

I also considered trying to replace Pidgin with irssi and bitlbee but Pidgin + OTR works so well, and I have no idea about how well OTR works with bitlbee/irssi (well, actually, I’ve found irssi + OTR to be flaky at best.

Web

Not much changed here either, Firefox dominates, and I haven’t looked further into uzbl although that is still on the TODO list, for some day.

I do some times also use w3m, elinks, wget, curl and perl-libwww.

My Firefox is customized with NoScript, RequestPolicy, some other stuff, and Pentadactyl.

Privoxy is nowadays also part of the loadout, to filter out ads and other undesirable web “resources”.

Development

In this category there has actually been some changes:

  • gvim has been completely dropped
  • eclipse has been dropped, using vim instead
  • mercurial has been replaced by git

Thanks in no small part to my job, I have gotten more intimate knowledge of awk and expect, as well as beginning to learn Perl.

I still do some Python hacking, a whole lot of shell scripting, and for many of these hacks, SQLite is a faithful companion.

Doh! I completely forgot that I’ve been dabbling around with Erlang as well, and that mscgen has been immensely helpful in helping me visualize communication paths between various modules.

“Office suite”

I still use LaTeX for PDF creation (sorry hook, still haven’t gotten around to checking out ConTeXt), I haven’t really used sc at all, it was just too hard to learn the controls, and I had too few spreadsheets in need of creating. I use qalculate almost on a weekly basis, but for shell scripts I’ve started using bc instead.

A potential replacement for sc could be teapot, but again, I usually don’t create spreadsheets…

Server

Since I’ve dropped mercurial, and since the mercurial-server package suddenly stopped working after a system update, I couldn’t be bothered to fix it, and it is now dropped.

screen and irssi is of course always a winning combination.

nginx and uwsgi has not been used to any extent, I haven’t tried setting up a VPN service, but I have a couple of ideas for the coming year (mumble, some VPN service, some nginx + Python/Perl thingies, bitlbee) and maybe replace the Ubuntu installation with Debian.

Organization

I still use both vimwiki and vim outliner, and my Important Dates Notifier script.

Still no TaskJuggler, and I haven’t gotten much use out of abook.

remind has completely replaced when, while I haven’t gotten any use what so ever out of wyrd.

Entertainment

For consuming stuff I use evince (PDF), mplayer (video), while for music, moc has had to step down from the throne, to leave place for mpd and ncmpcpp.

eog along with gthumb (replacing geeqie) handles viewing images.

For manipulation/creation needs I use LaTeX, or possibly Scribus, ffmpeg, audacity, imagemagick, inkscape, and gimp.

Bonus: Security

I thought I’d add another category, security, since I finally have something worthwhile to report here.

I’ve begun encrypting selected parts of my hard drive (mostly my email directory) using EncFS, and I use my passtore script for password management.

And sometimes (this was mostly relevant for when debugging passtore after having begun actively using it) when I have a sensitive file which I for a session need to store on the hard drive, in clear text, I use quixand to create an encrypted directory with a session key only stored in RAM. So once the session has ended, there is little chance of retrieving the key and decrypting the encrypted directory.

Ending notes

That’s about it. Some new stuff, mostly old stuff, only a few things getting kicked off the list. My stack is pretty stable for now. I wonder what cool stuff I will find in 2012 :D

:wq

2011w24

Sunday, June 19th, 2011

Vim

I have begun to use {c,d}f<character> to change or delete from the cursor up until (including) <character>.

It has made me a little bit faster in some few edge cases of text-editing, but today (Monday) I found myself in need of doing a couple of manipulations on text up until (NOT including) <character>.

SuperUser.com helped me find {c,d}t<character>.

Very nice :)

MediaWiki sortable tables

In preparation for FSCONS one of my duties as team leader for the Hardware team is to keep track of all the hardware available to FSCONS (i.e. hardware owned by FFKP) and Jonas felt it would be a good idea to have that list available on a wiki.

When I was done adding the laptops and cameras it kindof bugged me that I’d added the laptops in the “wrong” order (i.e. the serial number column wasn’t ordered).

Luckily this was an easy fix, as one can add class="wikitable sortable" to the table header in the wiki-syntax and it will automagically add the necessary javascript and buttons to make each column sortable.

FreedomBox

The “Bump” Challenge aimed at creating a simple(r) way of exchanging public keys and establishing trust, possibly (probably?) using smartphones which are able to sync with the FreedomBox, seems like a rather nice idea.

Personal Wikis

A wiki can be a great tool, and for a while I was maintaining a personal mediawiki installation, just adding stuff I needed from time to time, but never often enough that I could learn it.

Then I stumbled over Zim, which became collateral damage as I got into my “replace as much as possible with a command-line alternative”-phase (this phase hasn’t abated yet ;)) which left me migrating to VimWiki.

I am not likely to replace VimWiki, it works well for me, but sometimes it might not be the right tool for the job. Which is why I am always on the lookout for new stuff.

I already knew about ikiWiki, but at the time I discovered it I didn’t have the time to look further into it. I guess I should change that.

And today I found TiddlyWiki, a wiki self-contained within an html file. Which people have extended for other uses.

SQLite Triggers

SQLite has support for triggers, how cool is that?! And these triggers can be triggered by other triggers! :D

Links

Vim Casts is a Vim screencast resource for learning / improving your knowledge in Vim (thank you for the tip hook).

Tahoe-LAFS (Least Authority File System) is a decentralized fault-tolerant peer-to-peer file system. I can’t really speak about its security, but it looks pretty good, at least on paper.

ZRTP seems to be a pretty cool VoIP encryption protocol, and there seems to be an implementation for Android devices as well.

“Towards a Lifelong Content Management System” is a rather nice, well thought-through blog post on how we might want to change the way we think about content management systems (thanks @mlinksva).

:wq

My software stack revisited – Organizing

Monday, December 27th, 2010

Back in the original post, I don’t think I actually had this category at all. In fact, I do believe all the applications I am about to list in this post are additions to my stack.

Knowledge management

Knowledge is power. But only if you have that knowledge accessible and stored in a fashion which makes the retrieval of the relevant parts of it both simple and timely.

This is more true the more knowledge you accumulate.

For storing growing amounts of knowledge, I have come to find a wiki the best alternative. It does require some initial thinking, about how to structure the information being saved within it, but in my experience the benefits outweigh the work. Simply think of it as an investment.

Some of the knowledge I collect is pure information which no one but me should have access to, so I didn’t especially like the idea of putting the stuff into a web-based wiki. And that’s where desktop wikis comes into relevancy.

I tried out Zim, a GUI-centric desktop wiki. It works great, and I do recommend it. And it is as lightweight as they come. But… that was before I realized there is a Vim plugin: VimWiki.

Outlining

For some reason I find it much easier to break down problems into smaller pieces if I use software (or hardware, pen and paper FTW), than if I do it in my head.

Whatever the reason for this is, I have found a friend in another Vim plugin: VimOutliner. One of the tasks that VimOutliner helped me split into smaller pieces, and organize? This series of posts.

Calendar

Like with the knowledge management (and Zim), I have already managed to iterate through a solution, which consisted of the CLI-based cal, which just prints out a simple three month view (previous, current, next) and should be included by default in most if not all GNU/Linux distributions, when which is a script that parse a file filled with rule-based constraints, all detailing dates, or ranges of dates, when things happen.

when is an excellent piece of software, and if you can take the syntax (me, being a programmer, found it quite straightforward) but I began feeling a lack of putting it all in context easily when adding new dates (specifically if I already had appointments on a specific date, and what dates would possibly be better).

Which made me try out calcurse. Not to replace when, but to complement it. Sadly neither when, nor calcurse, saves date/appointment data in a format which the other recognize. In fact, both save in a format only they themselves understand. This made synchronizing between the two inefficient.

I said that when is excellent. I also said that I’d iterated through a solution, which means I am no longer using when. And I wouldn’t replace an excellent piece of software with a mediocre one, so whatever I replaced when with, would need to be at least as good as when, but without the drawbacks.

Enter bumby who came along and urged me to try remind which does the exact same thing as when, but with a different syntax. But remind has one big advantage. There is another program, wyrd, which is to remind what calcurse was to when, with one difference: wyrd doesn’t save appointments in a format of its own. It is just a wrapper around reminds appointment files.

All these files, whether from when, calcurse or remind, are of course all plaintext.

Contacts

Finally, comes an address book, simply named abook. It is an ncurses-based lightweight little application for storing and viewing contact information about people.

Thunderbird provides the same thing, so some duplication of effort / breaking of DRY is occurring here, but I feel it justified as I could fetch relevant information from abook, and be on my way contacting the person, before Thunderbird has loaded and come into a usable state.

The next post will be focusing on the largest single change to have been implemented since the original post: the addition of a server.

:wq