Posts Tagged ‘syslog’

2011w33

Sunday, August 21st, 2011

LaTeX

The adventures in LaTeX-land continues. Rikard didn’t want any page number displayed on the table of contents page, and after having tried a couple of different variants of \pagestyle{empty} and the likes we realized that for some reason that won’t work at all in the book-class. \pagenumbering{gobble}, however, seems to work in every class, but NOT inside the actual document (so I guess this means after having issued the first \chapter or \section command).

For the interested, I found the answer by searching and finding this post, which in turn lead me here.

RSS for logging purposes

I am toying with the idea of writing a small daemon which would create an RSS feed (or Atom or whatever is popular today, I don’t care) which I could then plug into feed2imap which I have on the server.

The idea then would be that I could write small monitoring scripts for whatever I wanted, check the temperature, check space on the disks, whatever, and have fcron execute these scripts every now and then, and the result of these scripts would be fed into the RSS daemon.

I haven’t thought this through yet at any rate, but I quite like the idea. We’ll see what comes of it :)

Revisiting my old friend Django

Grégoire (or as we like to call him, greg) began working on a Django implementation of the myConf concept, and I am helping out as best I can with it.

There were some template bugs which made the template overly complex which I am currently trying to iron out, and mostly the problem seems to boil down to that the input data to the template is stored in a way which makes access in the template harder than necessary.

So I’m attempting splitting the data up further, and using dictionaries as the overall structure, which of course meant that I needed to find how to iterate over a dictionary in Django.

I admit that it was quite some time since I read the Django docs, and had I done so I would eventually have found the solution, but google, as usual, beat me to finding the solution somewhere else.

The relevant parts are:

{% for key, value in dictionary.items %}{{ value }}{% endfor %}

Links

A non-intrusive (but javascript-required) approach to comment spam filtering. It’s probably a good solution, but I don’t like forcing users to activate javascript in their browser.

This is just plain frakking disgusting.

Interesting, and well-documented, approach to combating email spam.