Posts Tagged ‘SOPA’

2012w3

Sunday, January 22nd, 2012

mitmproxy

Granted, there shouldn’t be all that many use cases for a software such as this for a non-pentesting, non-criminal, but the fact that it can record and replay previous interactions, which can be useful, for instance, to automate login on access protected networks (hopefully ones that we already have permission to enter, but find the actual logging in part a real hassle).

Procedural City, Part 1

I thoroughly enjoyed reading this entire series of blog posts, in which the author had the “simple” goal of generating an entire city, digitally, in a procedural manner.

Fedora Friendfinder

Ok, so this is just humor, but you know what? It is good humor :)

XXXTerm

This sounds like something kinky, but is in reality a minimalist web browser with sophisticated security features designed-in.

So, a bit like luakit but with a funnier name ;)

Pipeviewer

pipeviewer really is something I could have more use for, if I just ever remebered to use it ;)

The next SOPA

You know what? This guy is on the right track. And I think Joel is as well.

MPAA shows us just why they are not a part of the solution. Mostly it is because they, and the rest of the abusive copyright-holders are their own worst enemy. Of course, they won’t go down peacefully, so it really is time for us to start fighting back. And there are plenty of targets to chose from.

In related news, it seems the Polish internet community is “unhappy” with ACTA… very nice :)

2012w02

Sunday, January 15th, 2012

Update: Corrected link, thanks Ulf

This has been quite the busy week. Oodles and oodles of stuff happening, both nice and… less nice.

UEFI + SecureBoot

Microsoft up to no good again. Basically, on non-ARM systems Microsoft requires that a user can disable SecureBoot, but not on ARM systems (i.e. smartphones, tablets, and the upcoming ultrabooks). Anyone surprised?

Music Production

While I have no real interest in producing music myself—code and, to some extent, graphics have always come easier to me—I do have an interest in seeing tools like this come to GNU+Linux as well, since it means that’s one less category of creators not having the alternative to be creative in a free software environment :)

sshuttle

This project seems pretty cool, I haven’t tried it out yet, and the thing about uploading code to the server is something I’ll definitively look into before actually considering executing it, but all in all this looks like a pretty easy SSH tunneling/VPN mimicing proxy thingy solution which could be useful at times.

Especially if it means I can sit at an internet café or some such, and have all my traffic routed över SSH through my server at home, not having to worry about someone in that café sniffing it up.

tmux

I installed a local copy of tmux at work, and so far it has been a complement rather than a detriment to the way I work.

The one thing that I wasn’t pleased with at first, but which was trivially easy to fix, once I read a blogpost (also, don’t miss the second post), was that I wanted 11 shells all stacked on top / below eachother, with an even size (i.e. each should take up 1/11th of the tmux window height.

When splitting the window, to make room for another shell, it just divides the current shell height by two, and makes the one part the new shell, and the other part the old shell. For multiples of two I suppose this would work out fine, but with 11 shells?

So I went about it, and the tenth and eleventh shell were small.
But there are different preconfigured layouts, and you loop through them by repeatedly hitting the control sequence (I’ve mapped this to C^a) and space. One of those layouts proved to be just what I wanted :)

Raspberry Pi

Now this is a pretty cool project! For the condensed summary, read the wikipedia page. It is making the dream of a $100 computer a reality, and there are some pretty cool ideas already about how to put it to good use.

SOPA

Reddit doesn’t like SOPA, and Tim O’Reilly isn’t all that pleased either.

If you’re an Android user, and you don’t like SOPA either, there is an app for letting you know (by scanning barcodes) if a product is made by a pro-SOPA company so you can avoid supporting them.

There have been some advances which means that making a fuzz about it can pay off. Of course, it would be better to scrap those bills completely.

So, 2012-01-18 is still SOPA Blackout day and a whole lot of sites are participating, and you could join in as well (and if you want to join in, please be smart about it and host the javascript your own damn self so that the hosting server doesn’t go down… (which also means, get that javascript now, and not on tuesday evening when everyone else is going to try to get it))

Links

  • Privacy in social networks — not sure I understand how it is done, not sure that this implementation is optimal, but nice idea none the less
  • I read a post the other day, and the author of that post, while being in the right, just came off … I don’t know, but his post was a rant, and not the passionate kind, but the whiney kind, so I won’t be linking to his post, I have no wish to drive traffic to him. However, another person, with reasoning and values more aligned to my own, wrote a reaction post to his, which I feel was more constructive, and nicer, so here is the link to that post
  • Unfair advantages grow from irrational habits
  • Rikard tipped me off to a thoughtful TED talk video, which I liked alot, and through the speakers website I found, among others, this game—EVOKE—which seems to be pretty cool
  • I had the idea of building an image gallery a while ago, so when I came across this link I was a little interested in seeing how they’d approached it, but what I really took away from this site, is how much I liked their rather user-friendly step-by-step manual for getting it up and running
  • I wonder what he will create? :)
  • I don’t know if it’s just me, but non-flashy, low-requirements games make me all warm and fuzzy inside
  • I seem to recall that I wasn’t all that impressed with the unhosted project some time ago. This post (specifically the verification section) is exactly why I hesitate

2011w52

Sunday, January 1st, 2012

Merry belated christmas greetings everyone! And by the time this post is published I could extend it with Happy belated new years greetings as well ;)

vim + html5 syntax

I’ve been tinkering a lot with html5 during my vacation and vim just didn’t want to play nicely with the new html-tags.

Namely, as it wouldn’t recognise the new semantic structural tags (footer, header, article, section, nav, aside) it wouldn’t indent the source properly and it was a cause for both distraction, and the resulting frustration.

I was not the first to feel this frustration, and a quick search turned up this result which solved both the html and css syntax issues (check the comments for the css solution). Very elegant solution, and now I’ve also learned about vim’s .vim/after/ directory… That was pretty cool.

Learning html5

I’ve actually shied away from doing stuff with html5, as whenever I tried to wrap my head around the new tags and how they should be used, there were just a myriad of different sites interpreting the usage in subtle but differing ways, but I finally found a resource which makes sense to me, so until a definitive interpretation has been hammered out, that’s the one I’m going to stick with.

Also, for sticky footers using css, and html5, check out this page. I had no trouble getting that to work.

Links

This question pretty much sums up why I like the command line so much

This looks interesting for synching (and deleting) without having to worry about doing “the right thing”

Nice list of things one could do with a home server

Doing it for teh lulz, 1903 style

EA, Nintendo and Sony now only covertly support SOPA (through their membership in various interest organizations). Wanting to eat the cake and still have it huh?

Tom’s Hardware not being amused by SOPA

Oh how I so hope that Wikipedia, Google, et al, will go down this path. (I do think there is a difference between companies lobbying, writing laws, and pressuring governments, and companies urging people to put pressure on governments, so yes, I think this is ok)

An interesting theory about why cinemas are having such a rough time

Haven’t had a chance to try this, but creating art using a written grammar does sound pretty neat, especially if you could get a script and /dev/random involved as well ;)

German police tracking people via silent SMS. I am beginning to think that rms is correct in his cellphone “usage”

Too much reading and constant information overload makes us pretty little passive consumers

2011w51

Sunday, December 25th, 2011

Bash variable string operators

I had a file filled with URLs to files I needed to download. Some of the files on the list, however, had already been downloaded, so no need to do it all again.

Should be fairly easy, right? cat the file to a while loop, reading the lines one by one, extracting the filename from the URL, check that it isn’t existing already, and if it isn’t, download it with wget.

So… how do you go about extracting the filename? You could certainly use sed and store the extracted filename in a separate variable, but that seems kindof wasteful, especially in a one-liner while loop. This article provided me with another option.

${line##*/} which deletes the longest possible match from the left (which in this case means up to (including) the last “/”) i.e. everything up to the name of the file.

No can haz censorship plz

If you’d like to make it clear that you too oppose SOPA (which, fittingly, means “garbage” in Swedish) then head over to Github, pick up your very own copy of stopcensorship.js, embed it on your site, and you’re set :)

I am also noting, with some glee, that GoDaddy is catching a whole lot of flak for their support of SOPA.

The only thing companies truly understand is when you hit them where it hurts, and that is their wallets (or as some brilliant person jokingly expressed it: “stop hitting us in our quarterly reports!”), and the only way to do that, is by voting with your own wallet.

I’m so happy about the fact that more and more people are catching on to this realization that I could… shit rainbows :)

Japanese Whaling + Tsunami disaster relief funds = disgusting

Just when I didn’t believe it possible for the Japanese whaling industry to appear as bigger scumbags than they already appear (yes, it is a quite one-sided story we’re getting from “Whale Wars” but according to National Geographic, the whalers have gotten the chance to tell their side of the story, and it would seem likely that they decline because they know full well just what type of scumbags they are… but hey, that’s just my opinion…) they go and do even more disgusting stuff, like using money from the tsunami relief donations to hire security ships to keep the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society away from their dirty business…

:wq

2011w46

Sunday, November 20th, 2011

First of all: this is really disturbing.


Commands and flags

I think I’ve already mentioned watch, and how that could be useful at time (e.g. $ watch -n 10 -d 'ls -l')

I just found out about a value which can optionally be appended to the -d flag: -d=cumulative

It has its own flag as well --cumulative, and quoting the man-page it makes highlighting “sticky”, presenting a running display of all positions that have ever changed.

Also, this week I learnt about sdiff, which seems neat if you’re on a system which doesn’t have vim (and thus vimdiff) installed.

Anoter nice flag I just found for grep is -m <int> which tells grep to stop looking after the INT first matches.

Scripting Vim

Ok, so I’ve been running into this problem where I am using my own .vimrc configuration in other places, in systems where the vim version isn’t the same as the one I use myself.

This has proven problematic as some of the configuration options I use (most notably set cul (which gives me a better indication about which line the cursor is on)) doesn’t exist in … say a vim version less than 7.

Which meant that if I loaded the same .vimrc config on a system running a vim version earlier than 7, I’d get a warning at startup, which I’d have to press enter to pass by. Irritating.

As luck would have it, it isn’t all that difficult to make a little conditional to check which version is currently loading the config and just ignore the settings which won’t work for that version, such as:

if v:version >= 700
    set cul
endif

Links

Finally, at this years FSCONS I was introduced to the site renderfarm.fi where people can go to either contribute CPU-cycles, or get CPU-cycles, (or both) to help speed up rendering.

:wq