Posts Tagged ‘security’

2012w43

Sunday, October 28th, 2012

Idiocracy

No one can have missed the outrageous idiocracy in Italy which simply left me with a single question:
If they had warned, and panic had ensued, and people had gotten killed while trying to escape, and no quake would have hit… then what?… Seems like a case of “damned if you do, damned if you don’t”…

The US is implementing a “six strikes” type of deal (similar to the ?now defunct? French HADOPI) and apparently the “independent expert” used to draft a “reasonable” law might not have been so independent as they should have… being a former RIAA lobbying firm… The corruption surrounding the copyright industry is truly sickening.

I am probably waaaay to paranoid, but this reeks of false flag operation. Gotta keep the populus scared of them terrorists now don’t we?

Shut up and play nice: How the Western world is limiting free speech.

More and more I am beginning to think that the correct course of action is to completely boycott anyone who use the DMCA since it is used as a sledgehammer instead of a scalpel. I think this comment sums it up pretty well.

Surveillance / Privacy

Outsource government and corporate surveillance to people themselves… great…

Wait! Wait! Wait! You mean to say that geo-tagging can compromise ones privacy and security?!?! Nooo, who’d have thought?

Cool stuff

A distributed twitter thingy I think it’s cool and all, really cool, but I’d still go for identi.ca.

Sleipnir is a small proxy which you run, to intercept requests and serve local files instead. Not sure when or where I’d find use for it, but interesting concept none the less.

A rather good run-through of various tools for UNIX-like systems

Jeff Atwood wrote a post about the future of Markdown, and much have since been written and people have had opinions but from one of those discussions, what I found most interesting was Pandoc.

Stuff I learned

Great answer on how to better control node placement in a graphviz diagram.
And another answer on a similar question, although this should probably be considered an ugly-hack. Then again, there’s a time and place for everything.

Last week I prodded in some Perl code, and found myself unable to visualize just what the heck the internal structure of a variable looked like, and thought to myself Had this been PHP, I would have used var_dump(); I wonder if Perl have something similar?

Of course Perl has something similar.

use Data::Dumper;
print Dumper $my_mystery_var;

Source: Perl Mongers

Race-condition-free deployment with the “symlink replacement” trick

Food for thought

Why we can’t solve big problems.

Here’s a peculiar productivity hack: Hire a person to slap you in the face.

Compliance: The boring adult at the security party.

Why we buy into ideas: how to convince others of our thoughts

2012w14

Sunday, April 8th, 2012

Not a whole lot to say this week, it has mostly been work, sleep, work, sleep, … well you get the picture.

Some noteworthy things however:

Just how, in their infinite wisdom, does the EU expect to test the security of their own servers and services if they are going to outlaw so-called “cyber-attack tools”. For that matter, how do they propose ANY manufacturer of ANY type of digital system perform ANY type of actual security testing worth a damn?

Social AND Private? Well… not quite yet, but if they get the p2p and encryption stuff working, then we’re in business :)

ENCRYPT ALL THE THINGS! ;)

And it wouldn’t be one of my hallmark blagposts if it didn’t have some random links which may or may not be of any value, no would it?

Dunno just what it might be useful for, but creating 3D graphics procedurally using Lua, like with Fugu seems like just the right approach for me. If I were to do 3D models that is.

Now this promises to be an interesting game.

And a rather interesting programming language.

:wq

2011w50

Sunday, December 18th, 2011

tmux

tmux is a terminal multiplexer, resembling screen and seemingly straight-forward to configure.

Now, those of you paying attention will know that I use wmii, a tiling window manager, and you may ask what the difference is between creating one big tmux window and laying out a couple of terminals in that, or letting wmii place those terminals beside each other itself.

The answer is that for most instances, wmii will be enough, but just a little while ago I discovered a killer feature (one which makes me wish that tmux was available at work), namely the abililty to perform:

C^b:setw synchronize-panes

(demonstrated here) which simply outputs whatever you type into one of the terminals, into all the other terminals in this tmux instance as well.

How is this useful? If you have a couple of servers, on which you need to execute the exact same command, you simply start tmux, create a terminal for each server (and log in to that server) and then ask tmux to synchronize the panes, and then you type in your commands.

(Yes, this could probably be easily solved with a bash for-loop as well, depending on the amount of commands and their complexity)

Stupid Shell Tricks

I’ve known about ^foo^bar for a while (i.e. you type
$ some-command wif a typo
and you then do
$ ^wif^with
to have the shell replace the first instance of that typo with the correct spelling (hopefully ;D)

But, this is really only good for typos or when there is ONE instance to replace. ^foo^bar won’t replace EVERY foo with bar, only the first occurrance. Which is sometimes now what you wanted.

Enter !!:gs/foo/bar which replaces ALL instances of foo in the previous command, with bar, and re-executes it. Thanks to http://blog.urfix.com/25-linux-commands/ for that.

less

I think I have touched upon this before, but here we go anyway: it is possible to export an environment variable called “LESS” and less will read this and determine any runtime special behaviour based on the contents of the variable.

I am currently trying out export LESS='FiX' where F makes less exit if the contents are short enough to all fit on the screen, i is for case-insensitive search and X for stopping less from sending the termcap initialization and deinitialization strings.

This means that when less exits, it won’t clear the screen (which would be a bummer if using F and less:ing short files…)

Links

A pretty interesting read about how one could “work in the cloud.” I would have chosen other hardware/software (except for vim of course) but to all his/her own, right?

This sounds as if it could be useful for making sure that your logs are really your real logs. Makes sense, right? ;)

From the reptyr readme: reptyr is a utility for taking an existing running program and attaching it to a new terminal. Started a long-running process over ssh, but have to leave and don’t want to interrupt it? Just start a screen, use reptyr to grab it, and then kill the ssh session and head on home.

I am apparantly not the only one to get the idea of describing their software stack.

A pretty cool more-utils command, ifne, which continues execution of the rest of the command, iff data was coming into ifne’s stdin.

:wq