Posts Tagged ‘saas’

2012w34

Sunday, August 26th, 2012

Society

Note to self: Never give United Airlines any of my business.

Control, or lack thereof

Steve Wozniak sees trouble in the cloud (that makes two of us) and doesn’t think that the Internet should have gatekeepers or regulators.

This hacker news thread contains a quote which perfectly sums up one aspect of what I feel is wrong with SAAS: SAAS means you’re vulnerable to vendor change with every pageload.

Privacy

Sociability’s value comes from privacy An essay by Kyro Beshay, via Cory Doctorow.

It is a poor grade upon humanity that sites like this need even exist.

Olympics and corporate greed

The Olympic games this year really made capitalism show its ugliest sides:

Case in point: VISA. Did they really think that hassling non-VISA-card holders would make them any new friends?

Case in point: London Olympics committee. I am not completely unreasonable, I understand that if too many people set up their own wireless hot-spots in close proximity to the “sanctioned” hot-spots, and on the same frequencies, bad things will happen, but at the same time I can’t shake the feeling that they just wanted a monopoly on providing connectivity, and forcing people to pay through the nose for it.

Good intentions and the road to hell

I understand the benefit to first responders, if we allowed for a government-controlled “emergency switch” to open up wireless routers for mesh-use in disaster areas, many people on Twitter recommended the inhabitants of Oslo to do just that after the attack, but I see the very real potential for abuse from the same government and since they get to define what is or isn’t an emergency, and when things are in people’s and society’s best interests, I give this idea a “thumbs down”-grade.

Drawing the wrong lessons from horrific events

Abuse of power

Case in point: VISA

DHS issuing take-down notices No free speech for you!

Security

A tutorial about off-the-record messaging courtesy of monkeyiq

Albeit not being anywhere near ready for primetime, cryptosphere still looks like a really interesting project

I am unsure as to whether Burner, the service which provides temporary phone numbers, will have a net positive or negative impact on society at large (if it has any impact at all). The concept is cool, and perhaps can be useful in certain settings, while it could probably be abused in others.

And I feel much the same way about Deadman. It could probably be awesome for hiking trips and the likes, for when you really don’t want to be disturbed, but if something were to happen it would be nice if emergency services knew roughly where to look.

Schneier on Security: $200 for a Fake Security System And as one commenter said: It’s all fun and games until your cat dies of exhaustion.

Development

The Best Programming Advice I Ever Got, a rather refreshing thought, it probably would be good to make ourselves a little less dependent on tools and have that grey matter exercise some more.

A jQuery extension called labelfor to associate labels with form input elements.

I’ve written before about this game, but I keep thinking about it and always forgetting what it’s called, so just a reminder to myself.
More than that however, is that I’ve also started taking an interest in Ren’Py the framework on which don’t take it personally, babe, it just ain’t your story is built.
I think that could be used in a plethora of ways, both for entertainment, but also education, if not both at once.

The shell

A blog post about steps to take to improve the performance of shell scripts. Really nice.

SSH

SSH forced commands pretty useful stuff.

Sorting on multiple columns

One of the previous weeks I needed to sort a bunch of lines, but I had concluded that it would be way too much work to transpose the columns in the file in a way that sort would magically work.

Which meant I needed to dig into the flags sort support. I was fairly certain that what I wanted done could be done, I just had to find the way. man sort got old real quick, so I hit duckduckgo instead and found this post which gave me everything I needed, and in a nicely formatted way :)

I can’t remember the actual data I needed sorting, but his example of sorting IP addresses was what helped me, specifically -k 2,2n -k4,4n (i.e. numeric sort by column 2 first, then by column 4)

Vim, autocmd and context-aware file headers

I don’t know when I picked it up, or from where (probably pesa’s Vim config, but for some time I’ve been using a filetype.vim file, in the root of my .vim directory, the contents of which is a bunch of lines, looking something like this:

au! BufRead,BufNewFile *.sh setfiletype sh
au! BufNewFile *.sh so ~/.vim/templates/sh_header

And this works like a charm, every new script I start writing on will get a shebang automatically inserted at the beginning of the file.

I never thought about what else one could do with these autocommands though, until I stumbled over a reddit thread, which pointed me here.

If you look into step 2, you will see that the autocmds there does not only read a header into the new file, but also modifies dates etc.

That’s actually pretty sweet.

Data mirroring

Using duplicity as a stateful rsync

Git stuff

A whole bunch of (git) ignore-files for use in various projects

And uet another git feature I feel I really need to learn ;)

Misc

As this video will tell you it is pretty darn hard to understand the scales of stuff like planets. The video does however make a pretty good attempt at visualizing it.

In the past I have linked to a post which wasn’t all that impressed with the idea of hiding the concept of files from users, and here’s another post, this one not particularly impressed with hiding the concept of directories from the users.
For my part, I consider this to be pure idiocracy

Depending on how well executed it ends up being (in my case, light weight has precedence) reditr could be enormously useful.

I have been eyeing dwb as a potential firefox replacement. We’ll see what happens.

Syntactic parses text, and try to build an “understanding” about words, and how they fit together.

The Future is not Real-Time. Put that way, I too really hope it isn’t ;)

2012w11

Sunday, March 18th, 2012

This week has been filled with all sorts of fun and challenging stuff.

For one, I used Wireshark to (successfully) diagnose a problem for the first time :D

The problem was an overly restrictive iptables rule on the system I was trying to connect to, but boy did it feel good to identify and solve that problem on my own.

I also managed to squeeze in time to write scripts to two work buddies so that they didn’t need to perform overly repetitive and very error-prone tasks by hand. The one script even needed a little bit of Expect-scripting, which I’ve been aching to hack some more.

I also found out about vim‘s :e # (to try it out, open a file in vim, then :e someOtherFile followed by :e #)

I found a very pedagogic explanation about how quicksort works, which made me start thinking and wondering about algorithms in general again, even to the point of investigating quicksort further.

I also found this post which makes a fair point: IFF you are going to rely on a web service (in other words, a SaaS you are probably better off getting hooked up with one charging money for it.

Not that I could ever conscionable recommend anyone using a SaaS as this is bound to lock you into dependence of that provider, but sure, I get that some (most?) would rather throw money at it than learning (learning is scary, and you don’t have the time right?) to set up your own service.

Furthermore, I can’t really decide whether the author is being disingenuous or illiterate in naming this stance an “anti-free-software movement”. It is unclear if s/he meant “anti-gratis-software movement” or if s/he is actually feeling threatened by free software. Had there been a comment field on that “blog” I probably would have spent the two minutes required to ask, but since there isn’t one, I won’t bother, and on pure principle, if I ever need a bookmarking-service, I’ll just make sure to stay clear of that one, just in case s/he actually was taking a jab against free software.

Yes, I am petty and vindictive at times, shit happens.

Whilst toying with the idea of modifying my homepage a bit, a site wide change, I realized that it might make a lot of sense to rewrite it so that it is, if not template-based, at least modularized. But I guess I’ll continue thinking about that before making any changes.

A funny thing I just thought of out of the blue the other day was that with some sites, like LinkedIn and probably Facebook and others, there are options for giving these services your email account username and password, so that they could log in, check your contact list, and hook you up with other people you know.

But I am pretty sure that most email providers license agreements state (no, I haven’t checked, but it would be foolish of these mail providers not to) that it would be a violation of said agreement for the user to disclose their account password to anyone else.

Then again, I don’t really understand people who would use those tools, but I guess there are even more people who wouldn’t understand why I chose not to…

A very interesting read about the Batman and the Joker. Those who know me can probably guess what character I voted for.

I’ve also been thinking about the prospect of storing binaries in some sort of version control, mostly because I have a friend who is into game development/modding, and doing so without version control. And that has bitten him in the ass more than once now.

And since I am nowadays a git convert I naturally started looking there, and found this, which lead me, among other places, here. Haven’t tried it yet, but it is definitively an interesting idea.

And now that I have begun working with Wireshark, tcpdump seems to be a good next step.

Finally, yet another reason why the patent industry needs to change.

:wq