Posts Tagged ‘rsync’

2012w43

Sunday, October 28th, 2012

Idiocracy

No one can have missed the outrageous idiocracy in Italy which simply left me with a single question:
If they had warned, and panic had ensued, and people had gotten killed while trying to escape, and no quake would have hit… then what?… Seems like a case of “damned if you do, damned if you don’t”…

The US is implementing a “six strikes” type of deal (similar to the ?now defunct? French HADOPI) and apparently the “independent expert” used to draft a “reasonable” law might not have been so independent as they should have… being a former RIAA lobbying firm… The corruption surrounding the copyright industry is truly sickening.

I am probably waaaay to paranoid, but this reeks of false flag operation. Gotta keep the populus scared of them terrorists now don’t we?

Shut up and play nice: How the Western world is limiting free speech.

More and more I am beginning to think that the correct course of action is to completely boycott anyone who use the DMCA since it is used as a sledgehammer instead of a scalpel. I think this comment sums it up pretty well.

Surveillance / Privacy

Outsource government and corporate surveillance to people themselves… great…

Wait! Wait! Wait! You mean to say that geo-tagging can compromise ones privacy and security?!?! Nooo, who’d have thought?

Cool stuff

A distributed twitter thingy I think it’s cool and all, really cool, but I’d still go for identi.ca.

Sleipnir is a small proxy which you run, to intercept requests and serve local files instead. Not sure when or where I’d find use for it, but interesting concept none the less.

A rather good run-through of various tools for UNIX-like systems

Jeff Atwood wrote a post about the future of Markdown, and much have since been written and people have had opinions but from one of those discussions, what I found most interesting was Pandoc.

Stuff I learned

Great answer on how to better control node placement in a graphviz diagram.
And another answer on a similar question, although this should probably be considered an ugly-hack. Then again, there’s a time and place for everything.

Last week I prodded in some Perl code, and found myself unable to visualize just what the heck the internal structure of a variable looked like, and thought to myself Had this been PHP, I would have used var_dump(); I wonder if Perl have something similar?

Of course Perl has something similar.

use Data::Dumper;
print Dumper $my_mystery_var;

Source: Perl Mongers

Race-condition-free deployment with the “symlink replacement” trick

Food for thought

Why we can’t solve big problems.

Here’s a peculiar productivity hack: Hire a person to slap you in the face.

Compliance: The boring adult at the security party.

Why we buy into ideas: how to convince others of our thoughts

2012w34

Sunday, August 26th, 2012

Society

Note to self: Never give United Airlines any of my business.

Control, or lack thereof

Steve Wozniak sees trouble in the cloud (that makes two of us) and doesn’t think that the Internet should have gatekeepers or regulators.

This hacker news thread contains a quote which perfectly sums up one aspect of what I feel is wrong with SAAS: SAAS means you’re vulnerable to vendor change with every pageload.

Privacy

Sociability’s value comes from privacy An essay by Kyro Beshay, via Cory Doctorow.

It is a poor grade upon humanity that sites like this need even exist.

Olympics and corporate greed

The Olympic games this year really made capitalism show its ugliest sides:

Case in point: VISA. Did they really think that hassling non-VISA-card holders would make them any new friends?

Case in point: London Olympics committee. I am not completely unreasonable, I understand that if too many people set up their own wireless hot-spots in close proximity to the “sanctioned” hot-spots, and on the same frequencies, bad things will happen, but at the same time I can’t shake the feeling that they just wanted a monopoly on providing connectivity, and forcing people to pay through the nose for it.

Good intentions and the road to hell

I understand the benefit to first responders, if we allowed for a government-controlled “emergency switch” to open up wireless routers for mesh-use in disaster areas, many people on Twitter recommended the inhabitants of Oslo to do just that after the attack, but I see the very real potential for abuse from the same government and since they get to define what is or isn’t an emergency, and when things are in people’s and society’s best interests, I give this idea a “thumbs down”-grade.

Drawing the wrong lessons from horrific events

Abuse of power

Case in point: VISA

DHS issuing take-down notices No free speech for you!

Security

A tutorial about off-the-record messaging courtesy of monkeyiq

Albeit not being anywhere near ready for primetime, cryptosphere still looks like a really interesting project

I am unsure as to whether Burner, the service which provides temporary phone numbers, will have a net positive or negative impact on society at large (if it has any impact at all). The concept is cool, and perhaps can be useful in certain settings, while it could probably be abused in others.

And I feel much the same way about Deadman. It could probably be awesome for hiking trips and the likes, for when you really don’t want to be disturbed, but if something were to happen it would be nice if emergency services knew roughly where to look.

Schneier on Security: $200 for a Fake Security System And as one commenter said: It’s all fun and games until your cat dies of exhaustion.

Development

The Best Programming Advice I Ever Got, a rather refreshing thought, it probably would be good to make ourselves a little less dependent on tools and have that grey matter exercise some more.

A jQuery extension called labelfor to associate labels with form input elements.

I’ve written before about this game, but I keep thinking about it and always forgetting what it’s called, so just a reminder to myself.
More than that however, is that I’ve also started taking an interest in Ren’Py the framework on which don’t take it personally, babe, it just ain’t your story is built.
I think that could be used in a plethora of ways, both for entertainment, but also education, if not both at once.

The shell

A blog post about steps to take to improve the performance of shell scripts. Really nice.

SSH

SSH forced commands pretty useful stuff.

Sorting on multiple columns

One of the previous weeks I needed to sort a bunch of lines, but I had concluded that it would be way too much work to transpose the columns in the file in a way that sort would magically work.

Which meant I needed to dig into the flags sort support. I was fairly certain that what I wanted done could be done, I just had to find the way. man sort got old real quick, so I hit duckduckgo instead and found this post which gave me everything I needed, and in a nicely formatted way :)

I can’t remember the actual data I needed sorting, but his example of sorting IP addresses was what helped me, specifically -k 2,2n -k4,4n (i.e. numeric sort by column 2 first, then by column 4)

Vim, autocmd and context-aware file headers

I don’t know when I picked it up, or from where (probably pesa’s Vim config, but for some time I’ve been using a filetype.vim file, in the root of my .vim directory, the contents of which is a bunch of lines, looking something like this:

au! BufRead,BufNewFile *.sh setfiletype sh
au! BufNewFile *.sh so ~/.vim/templates/sh_header

And this works like a charm, every new script I start writing on will get a shebang automatically inserted at the beginning of the file.

I never thought about what else one could do with these autocommands though, until I stumbled over a reddit thread, which pointed me here.

If you look into step 2, you will see that the autocmds there does not only read a header into the new file, but also modifies dates etc.

That’s actually pretty sweet.

Data mirroring

Using duplicity as a stateful rsync

Git stuff

A whole bunch of (git) ignore-files for use in various projects

And uet another git feature I feel I really need to learn ;)

Misc

As this video will tell you it is pretty darn hard to understand the scales of stuff like planets. The video does however make a pretty good attempt at visualizing it.

In the past I have linked to a post which wasn’t all that impressed with the idea of hiding the concept of files from users, and here’s another post, this one not particularly impressed with hiding the concept of directories from the users.
For my part, I consider this to be pure idiocracy

Depending on how well executed it ends up being (in my case, light weight has precedence) reditr could be enormously useful.

I have been eyeing dwb as a potential firefox replacement. We’ll see what happens.

Syntactic parses text, and try to build an “understanding” about words, and how they fit together.

The Future is not Real-Time. Put that way, I too really hope it isn’t ;)

2012w16

Sunday, April 22nd, 2012

I ought to dedicate this blog post to git and rsync: The hard drive on my netbook died this week. I haven’t attempted to recover anything from the disk yet, but of that which is most important I figure I haven’t lost anything at all. And that’s due in no small part to git and rsync.

All of my configuration files, at least those I care about, had been added to a git repository. And most of the binaries I wanted to preserve had been rsynced to my server.
Not all of it though, which is a shame, but it shouldn’t be hard to replace what I’ve lost. Especially if I can get the old hard drive to function just one more time, just long enough to at least make a list of what it is I’m missing. The rest of the disk, well, it’s spring, perhaps a spring cleaning was in order.

So all is not lost, and looking beyond this setback, I did learn some other things this week (except for the fact that I need to become better at performing backups) such as:

Also, quite some time ago, I went around thinking about how to automatically track my working time, and while this isn’t exactly like what I had in mind (I would probably just have created a daemon which somehow fetched the window title of the currently active window from X, and did so randomly 6 times per hour (not deterministically enough to be able to cheat the system).

And some assorted links which may or may not be of any particular use for anyone:

:wq

2011w52

Sunday, January 1st, 2012

Merry belated christmas greetings everyone! And by the time this post is published I could extend it with Happy belated new years greetings as well ;)

vim + html5 syntax

I’ve been tinkering a lot with html5 during my vacation and vim just didn’t want to play nicely with the new html-tags.

Namely, as it wouldn’t recognise the new semantic structural tags (footer, header, article, section, nav, aside) it wouldn’t indent the source properly and it was a cause for both distraction, and the resulting frustration.

I was not the first to feel this frustration, and a quick search turned up this result which solved both the html and css syntax issues (check the comments for the css solution). Very elegant solution, and now I’ve also learned about vim’s .vim/after/ directory… That was pretty cool.

Learning html5

I’ve actually shied away from doing stuff with html5, as whenever I tried to wrap my head around the new tags and how they should be used, there were just a myriad of different sites interpreting the usage in subtle but differing ways, but I finally found a resource which makes sense to me, so until a definitive interpretation has been hammered out, that’s the one I’m going to stick with.

Also, for sticky footers using css, and html5, check out this page. I had no trouble getting that to work.

Links

This question pretty much sums up why I like the command line so much

This looks interesting for synching (and deleting) without having to worry about doing “the right thing”

Nice list of things one could do with a home server

Doing it for teh lulz, 1903 style

EA, Nintendo and Sony now only covertly support SOPA (through their membership in various interest organizations). Wanting to eat the cake and still have it huh?

Tom’s Hardware not being amused by SOPA

Oh how I so hope that Wikipedia, Google, et al, will go down this path. (I do think there is a difference between companies lobbying, writing laws, and pressuring governments, and companies urging people to put pressure on governments, so yes, I think this is ok)

An interesting theory about why cinemas are having such a rough time

Haven’t had a chance to try this, but creating art using a written grammar does sound pretty neat, especially if you could get a script and /dev/random involved as well ;)

German police tracking people via silent SMS. I am beginning to think that rms is correct in his cellphone “usage”

Too much reading and constant information overload makes us pretty little passive consumers

2011w31

Sunday, August 7th, 2011

(python) mechanize and BeautifulSoup

I’m slowly making preparations to replace WordPress with, as it currently stands, fugitive.

But I have a couple of posts in WordPress, 150—counting this one—to be more precise… which I don’t particularly feel like just abandoning, well… at least not all of them ;)

This means that they need to be preserved, and that’s where python’s two excellent modules mechanize and BeautifulSoup come into play.

Yes, I know relying on Beautiful Soup is discouraged nowadays, but as long as it works, I’ll be using it.

There is this great post about the basics of mechanize which, and since I only wanted to scrape a couple of posts, that was all I needed.

I needed Beautiful Soup to soup.find('link', {'rel': 'next'}) (i.e. get the URL for the “next” post) and then there was the little problem of retrieving the href-attribute from the found link-element.

StackOverflow to the rescue!

rsync

I found myself needing to synchronize a folder between two systems. I.e. new files added in the “source” system needed to be added to the “destination” which is a simple
$ rsync -av /path/to/source/directory/ user@remote:/path/to/destination/directory/
(please note the trailing slashes in BOTH paths, these in the source path, which tell rsync to copy the files INSIDE the directory, not including the directory itself).

However, for the first time I also needed that all removed files in source should be removed at the destination as well. I found this blogpost which gave me the information I needed.

This is… not trickier, but… not something you’d want to frakk up.

So, the flag which will delete on the removed files is simply --delete i.e.:

$ rsync -av --delete /path/to/source/directory/ user@remote:/path/to/destination/directory/

BEFORE you do this you REALLY should check that the operation will perform correctly by also attaching the flag --dry-run (which will simulate the real deal, without doing any changes on the remote end). Very nice.

$ rsync --dry-run -av --delete /path/to/source/directory/ user@remote:/path/to/destination/directory/

Musings

@shiny posted a notice about “open surface” being the perfect term for software that should be avoided.

@webmink, in what feels like true hacker fashion, cleverly played around with the words of the term and came up with “superficially open”.

Links

The Longest joke in the world

:wq

Random thoughts of a sleep-deprived mind…

Monday, January 28th, 2008

Couldn’t sleep last night, went to bed around 0100 hours (a little late, but I figured I’d manage with 5 hours worth of sleep, as I always try to trick myself) and just tossed and turned until I finally gave up trying to sleep around 0200, and sat down in front of the computer again, watched a movie… or two… while researching some on Lisp and Perl.

This continued until about 0500 when I finally started to feel so sleepy that I surely couldn’t stay awake even if I wanted to (which I didn’t). Oh how wrong I was. A quarter to six I was beginning to drift out of consciousness and into dreamland, but then I realized the futility and just lay there awaiting the alarm from my cellphone.

Great way to start a new day… really… not. So now I’m in school feeling pretty shitty, tired, queasy and freezing. So why would I want to share with you any thought currently in my mind? Good question, I sure as frack don’t have an answer (btw, may the Lords of Cobol make the writers strike end soon so that we can have season 4), but for what it’s worth (probably not much) here goes:

On a more serious note (not that Python, Perl, Erlang, Firefox, sshfs and rsync isn’t serious business) it gladdens my heart to see that more and more governments around the world are embracing the Open Document Format. Hopefully this more than anything will put an end to the madness that is Microsoft OOXML.

Over and out