Posts Tagged ‘git’

2012w43

Sunday, October 28th, 2012

Idiocracy

No one can have missed the outrageous idiocracy in Italy which simply left me with a single question:
If they had warned, and panic had ensued, and people had gotten killed while trying to escape, and no quake would have hit… then what?… Seems like a case of “damned if you do, damned if you don’t”…

The US is implementing a “six strikes” type of deal (similar to the ?now defunct? French HADOPI) and apparently the “independent expert” used to draft a “reasonable” law might not have been so independent as they should have… being a former RIAA lobbying firm… The corruption surrounding the copyright industry is truly sickening.

I am probably waaaay to paranoid, but this reeks of false flag operation. Gotta keep the populus scared of them terrorists now don’t we?

Shut up and play nice: How the Western world is limiting free speech.

More and more I am beginning to think that the correct course of action is to completely boycott anyone who use the DMCA since it is used as a sledgehammer instead of a scalpel. I think this comment sums it up pretty well.

Surveillance / Privacy

Outsource government and corporate surveillance to people themselves… great…

Wait! Wait! Wait! You mean to say that geo-tagging can compromise ones privacy and security?!?! Nooo, who’d have thought?

Cool stuff

A distributed twitter thingy I think it’s cool and all, really cool, but I’d still go for identi.ca.

Sleipnir is a small proxy which you run, to intercept requests and serve local files instead. Not sure when or where I’d find use for it, but interesting concept none the less.

A rather good run-through of various tools for UNIX-like systems

Jeff Atwood wrote a post about the future of Markdown, and much have since been written and people have had opinions but from one of those discussions, what I found most interesting was Pandoc.

Stuff I learned

Great answer on how to better control node placement in a graphviz diagram.
And another answer on a similar question, although this should probably be considered an ugly-hack. Then again, there’s a time and place for everything.

Last week I prodded in some Perl code, and found myself unable to visualize just what the heck the internal structure of a variable looked like, and thought to myself Had this been PHP, I would have used var_dump(); I wonder if Perl have something similar?

Of course Perl has something similar.

use Data::Dumper;
print Dumper $my_mystery_var;

Source: Perl Mongers

Race-condition-free deployment with the “symlink replacement” trick

Food for thought

Why we can’t solve big problems.

Here’s a peculiar productivity hack: Hire a person to slap you in the face.

Compliance: The boring adult at the security party.

Why we buy into ideas: how to convince others of our thoughts

2012w38

Sunday, September 23rd, 2012

Patent / Copyright madness

Automated copyright enforcement really seems to work well… NOT!

And Apple is up to no good as usual…

Patent trolls trolling around, but it would seem not without a fight :)

Oh, and if you were thinking of setting up a service which required a login, and you thought you’d protect people’s accounts well, then that might be patented…

Programming

Through this reddit thread (referencing it both for source and because the comments in there are relevant) I was lead to this post sometime this week or last.

And this weekend, while doing the weekly write-up, I re-read the post, and started thinking, because I kindof feel that my own hobby projects very easily fall victim to this. They get shot down because I start thinking of how much stuff I would have to rewrite (things I’ve already solved in previous projects, but never put down the time to make generic enough to reuse) or figure out, and it just takes my edge off wanting to sit down and do it.

But then it struck me, what help me get reinvigorated, what helps me come over at least that hurdle: A moderately quiet place, time enough for a conversation, a good (programmer) friend, and optionally a beer.

Broken gets fixed. Shoddy lasts forever — I wonder, does this mean that, if something is shoddy and you want it fixed, the correct action is to break it? ;)

git

I found myself wanting a way to have a central repository react to pushes based on what branch was pushed (I am working on a script at work, which some of my colleagues are beta-testing for me).

Whilst I develop a new feature I need a way to push that potentially buggy version of the script to a path where the testers can find it, while using a completely different path for the stable version which everyone else could use without any big risk of it messing anything up.

What I ended up with was this:

#!/bin/sh

read _from _to _branchPath
_branch=`basename $_branchPath`

if [ "$_branch" == "develop" ];
then
    cd /path/to/local/repository/on/server
    unset GIT_DIR
    git pull
    git checkout develop
    cp -f ./scriptname /path/to/beta/test/directory/
fi

Two questions on Stack Overflow helped me out tremendously: This and this (and as always, pesa was a big help too)

And since I agree with this post (namely that vimdiff would be a great diff viewer for git) I went ahead and followed the instructions of that post :)

vim

Using vimwiki to track time sounds brilliant. It’s almost enticing enough for me to look into vimscripting to help out. Yet another project I’d like to spend time on :S

Being that paranoid soul I am, and now that I can also call myself a tester, I realize I’ve become even more aware of how many different entry points there are which needs to secured, such as vim’s modelines (protip: use secure modelines

From this post I learnt about license-loader, which I need to look into.

awk

I found this post to be an excellent intro to awk, I am going to spread this around whenever I need to show anyone the basics :)

Misc

This post about 52Hz made me kindof sad :/

On the other hand, this post filled me with some hope.

I think it could be beneficial if this site was more widely distributed, so here’s me doing my part.

Finally, this post was pretty cool, and I immediately thought of at least two people I know who would get a kick out of reading this. :)

:wq

2012w35

Sunday, September 2nd, 2012

I’ll try to keep this post short, only the most significant discoveries from this week:

git add –patch

This is the biggest revelation I’ve made in quite some time.

What it will do for me is to give me a chance to select “(c)hunks” of modified code inside a file, which I want to add to the coming commit.

If I were more disciplined while programming, that shouldn’t be necessary, but I hack on a new feature, notice a typo in another part of the code, fix the typo and continue hacking.

And then, should I just do a git add <file> the commit message would either need to be “hacked on feature and fixed typo” (ugly) or… I guess I could omit mentioning the typo fix in the commit message…

But with --patch I can now split these two unrelated changes into different commits and have a clean commit history. Awesomeness ensues!

business.txt

Just like the proposal a couple of months ago about a freedom.txt (aw crap, I just remembered I haven’t done anything with that yet…) there is now a new idea, more engineered towards businesses, aptly called business.txt, and I find myself liking that idea pretty much.

:wq

2012w34

Sunday, August 26th, 2012

Society

Note to self: Never give United Airlines any of my business.

Control, or lack thereof

Steve Wozniak sees trouble in the cloud (that makes two of us) and doesn’t think that the Internet should have gatekeepers or regulators.

This hacker news thread contains a quote which perfectly sums up one aspect of what I feel is wrong with SAAS: SAAS means you’re vulnerable to vendor change with every pageload.

Privacy

Sociability’s value comes from privacy An essay by Kyro Beshay, via Cory Doctorow.

It is a poor grade upon humanity that sites like this need even exist.

Olympics and corporate greed

The Olympic games this year really made capitalism show its ugliest sides:

Case in point: VISA. Did they really think that hassling non-VISA-card holders would make them any new friends?

Case in point: London Olympics committee. I am not completely unreasonable, I understand that if too many people set up their own wireless hot-spots in close proximity to the “sanctioned” hot-spots, and on the same frequencies, bad things will happen, but at the same time I can’t shake the feeling that they just wanted a monopoly on providing connectivity, and forcing people to pay through the nose for it.

Good intentions and the road to hell

I understand the benefit to first responders, if we allowed for a government-controlled “emergency switch” to open up wireless routers for mesh-use in disaster areas, many people on Twitter recommended the inhabitants of Oslo to do just that after the attack, but I see the very real potential for abuse from the same government and since they get to define what is or isn’t an emergency, and when things are in people’s and society’s best interests, I give this idea a “thumbs down”-grade.

Drawing the wrong lessons from horrific events

Abuse of power

Case in point: VISA

DHS issuing take-down notices No free speech for you!

Security

A tutorial about off-the-record messaging courtesy of monkeyiq

Albeit not being anywhere near ready for primetime, cryptosphere still looks like a really interesting project

I am unsure as to whether Burner, the service which provides temporary phone numbers, will have a net positive or negative impact on society at large (if it has any impact at all). The concept is cool, and perhaps can be useful in certain settings, while it could probably be abused in others.

And I feel much the same way about Deadman. It could probably be awesome for hiking trips and the likes, for when you really don’t want to be disturbed, but if something were to happen it would be nice if emergency services knew roughly where to look.

Schneier on Security: $200 for a Fake Security System And as one commenter said: It’s all fun and games until your cat dies of exhaustion.

Development

The Best Programming Advice I Ever Got, a rather refreshing thought, it probably would be good to make ourselves a little less dependent on tools and have that grey matter exercise some more.

A jQuery extension called labelfor to associate labels with form input elements.

I’ve written before about this game, but I keep thinking about it and always forgetting what it’s called, so just a reminder to myself.
More than that however, is that I’ve also started taking an interest in Ren’Py the framework on which don’t take it personally, babe, it just ain’t your story is built.
I think that could be used in a plethora of ways, both for entertainment, but also education, if not both at once.

The shell

A blog post about steps to take to improve the performance of shell scripts. Really nice.

SSH

SSH forced commands pretty useful stuff.

Sorting on multiple columns

One of the previous weeks I needed to sort a bunch of lines, but I had concluded that it would be way too much work to transpose the columns in the file in a way that sort would magically work.

Which meant I needed to dig into the flags sort support. I was fairly certain that what I wanted done could be done, I just had to find the way. man sort got old real quick, so I hit duckduckgo instead and found this post which gave me everything I needed, and in a nicely formatted way :)

I can’t remember the actual data I needed sorting, but his example of sorting IP addresses was what helped me, specifically -k 2,2n -k4,4n (i.e. numeric sort by column 2 first, then by column 4)

Vim, autocmd and context-aware file headers

I don’t know when I picked it up, or from where (probably pesa’s Vim config, but for some time I’ve been using a filetype.vim file, in the root of my .vim directory, the contents of which is a bunch of lines, looking something like this:

au! BufRead,BufNewFile *.sh setfiletype sh
au! BufNewFile *.sh so ~/.vim/templates/sh_header

And this works like a charm, every new script I start writing on will get a shebang automatically inserted at the beginning of the file.

I never thought about what else one could do with these autocommands though, until I stumbled over a reddit thread, which pointed me here.

If you look into step 2, you will see that the autocmds there does not only read a header into the new file, but also modifies dates etc.

That’s actually pretty sweet.

Data mirroring

Using duplicity as a stateful rsync

Git stuff

A whole bunch of (git) ignore-files for use in various projects

And uet another git feature I feel I really need to learn ;)

Misc

As this video will tell you it is pretty darn hard to understand the scales of stuff like planets. The video does however make a pretty good attempt at visualizing it.

In the past I have linked to a post which wasn’t all that impressed with the idea of hiding the concept of files from users, and here’s another post, this one not particularly impressed with hiding the concept of directories from the users.
For my part, I consider this to be pure idiocracy

Depending on how well executed it ends up being (in my case, light weight has precedence) reditr could be enormously useful.

I have been eyeing dwb as a potential firefox replacement. We’ll see what happens.

Syntactic parses text, and try to build an “understanding” about words, and how they fit together.

The Future is not Real-Time. Put that way, I too really hope it isn’t ;)

2012w29

Sunday, July 22nd, 2012
Copyright

So apparently just looking at an (web)article of a newspaper (or any web page containing copyrighted content) could mean you are infringing on that publishers copyright… do newspapers actually want to commit that kind of suicide?

I couldn’t decide whether to put this post under “Copyright” or “Censorship” since it involves the MAFIAA using the DMCA to silence things… in this particular case, it would seem, their members own marketing campaigns… With friends like the MAFIAA, who need enemies? :)

Patents

Portable electronic device, method, and graphical user interface for displaying electronic lists and documents now, how could this not apply to every type smartphone, pad, dumb-phone or, for that matter, laptop, in existence? How can such a patent even be granted?

Censorship

Censored by copyright for protesting being censored by copyright, somehow I don’t think that this was how laws were intended to be used when humanity first came up with the concept of rule of law…

Who would have thought that filtering the net may affect more than the specific group targeted by the filter? That’s impossible right?

Surveillance

Facebook is being creepy as hell as usual.

Apparently, Microsoft’s SkyDrive comes with some strings attached

Society

The European Commission intends to make open access all research findings funded by Horizon 2020. This is nice :)
Dunno if EC or UK was first, but UK is thinking along the same lines.

On the other side of the spectrum, i.e. not so nice, if things really are as dire as President Obama would have people believe, wouldn’t the responsible thing to do then, be to secure the infrastructure the hell up, instead of passing laws which any would-be imaginary-or-real terrorist would ignore?

I mean, one of the most idiotic plots in “24” was that nuclear power plants could be remote controlled over the internet. Or in Die Hard 4, that with a couple of taps on a keyboard, the bad guy could redirect a whole bunch of gas to go to the same place at the same time, building pressure, making big badaboom…

Now, if the infrastructure in fact support doing this, remotely, then those who put that in the specification, and those who produced it, and those who installed it, should all be found and tried for dangerously criminal negligence.

Of course, if the end game is to hollow out personal privacy and spy on your own citizens, then it would be better to nibble away on their rights through more new and ineffective laws, which can always be extended later when proven (through a real enemy, someone just being curious, or a false flag operation) not to work.

Justice Department sues telco for daring to challenge its secret demands for private information.

Activism

Targeting Shell with a fake PR campaign. I wonder how long it will be until lobbyists have bought an amendment to some law labeling this sort of activism as terrorism…

Join the Internet Defense League and make sure the internet never loses. Ever. Or, put another way, Rescue the lolcats from the evil clutches of the internet hate league!

Services

Blooie lets you chat online with people who like what you like I am just a tad bit sceptical about this one…

On the one hand, getting in touch with people who like what I like, Free Software, Programming, vim, etc. etc. Great! Buuuuut, how is this not willfully and intentionally putting yourself inside a filter bubble, and only exposing yourself for the types of opinions you yourself already hold? If two people say the same thing, isn’t one of them redundant? I remain a little unconvinced.

Command line

At work this week I needed to get a file from server1 to server3, and the only connection between the two was through an intermediary server, server2. Oh yeah, the only way to communicate between the servers where ssh. Sure, a three step approach was possible (scp file server2: ; ssh server2; scp file server3: ) but the file on server1 could get updated at times, which would mean yet another upload, so a simpler process was needed, a shell script with something along the lines of this:

cat $file | ssh user@server2 "ssh user@server3 \"cat > $file\""

Thanks go to pesa for coming up with the solution.

Programs

TMSU is a program which allows you to tag your files, and then perform queries on the tags, filtering out all files not tagged according to the queried constraints. Neat!

ownCloud is getting more interesting with every passing day.

I never really thought about the fact that you could do lots of things with locate such as adding flags, or configuring directories or files to disregard.

I found an expect-like utility named empty. Funnily enough I found it by checking out the examples of the Zenity fork: Yad.

Cuttlefish: Execute actions when specific events are triggered.

I am also currently trying out this vim statusline.

Throught this question I learnt about fold.

Development

Really nice ELI5 article about how flood fill works, using Zombies and Cats, and Python.

Reading this post and seeing the example resume I agree that what catmoon ponders about would be pretty cool.

Of course, the program should know what skills I have, and only select the relevant out of that set, based on the skills extracted from the job listings. At least that’s how I’d design it, as there is no good reason to lie about what you know and don’t know.

And now I finally grasp how two create quines!

When you screw up, and commit sensitive data to a git repository, this seems like a rather good way to handle it.
Oh and of course, if that sensitive data was a password, CONSIDER THE PASSWORD COMPROMISED AND CHANGE IT!

I had heard about the “Rosetta Code” before, but never got around to checking it out until this weekend, which is when I found this rather intriguing piece of Perl code.

I have to admit to being rather impressed about what one can do with html/css/javascript and some javascript libraries these days.

And although very cool, I still have yet to find a personal use for PhantomJS :/

Text books used in education should be written like this.

Other news

RasPies can now be ordered in bulk.

Here’s to the misfits.

Dunno what it’s good for, but it is pretty.

Stochastic, nerdtastic restaurant bill splitting.

Astronomy Picture of the Day har a pretty sweet image this week.

:wq

2012w25

Sunday, June 24th, 2012

Quite a while since I wrote a post now, I’ve not been sick or anything, but there has been a lot of work abound, and outside work I prioritized sleeping over writing. But now I’m back for the moment, so let’s get down to business :)

Since last time I’ve come up with new ways of abusing awk, such as having it find the highest value from a command outputting in the following syntax:

\t<characters, integers, fullstop>: <integer>\n

To make it a little more different, the command also spits out a header, as well as an additional newline after the end of output.

I just now, while writing this, came up with a different solution, which doesn’t use awk:

theCommand | grep -v '^[^ \t]\+' | tr -d ' ' | cut -d':' -f2 | sort -r | head -n 1

but what I ended up using was:

theCommand | awk 'BEGIN { highest = 0 } $0 ~ /^[ \t]/ { if ( $2 > highest ) { highest = $2 } } END { print highest }'

In this case, from what I can gather, awk is the more efficient solution. One process versus five.

Update: As Werner points out, the if statement isn’t really necessary (which also makes it possible to cut out the BEGIN statement as well):

theCommand | awk '/^[^ \t]/ && $2 > highest { highest = $2 } END { printf "%d\n", highest }'

Utilities

  • ditaa (a.k.a DIagrams Through Ascii Art) makes it easy to generate nice-looking diagram images from… rather nice-looking ASCII diagrams
  • docopt, a command-line interface description language, which also seems to support generating the parser for the CLI being described
  • Peity for generating different types of charts using jQuery and <canvas>
  • Ghost.py interacting with web pages, programmatically

As of late I have been thinking a great deal about backups and the project which seems the most interesting to me is Duplicity.

Random tech stuff

Other random not-so-techy stuff

What I pass for humour

:wq

2012w18

Sunday, May 6th, 2012

The scripty stuff

This week I finally managed to crack a problem I’d been trying to solve for a couple of weeks, namely how to only print the foobar errors, and the ensuing stack trace of these errors from a logfile:

awk 'BEGIN { section = 0 } /foobar/ { section = 1; print; next } /^[A-Z]/ && section == 1 { section = 0; next } section == 1 { print; next }' logfile 

Looking at the solution, I am kindof ashamed that it took me that long to get a workable solution…

I also found this neat little oneliner in a comment on reddit: echo "something long and space separated of which you want the last word" | rev | cut -d ' ' -f 1 | rev. Then again, I’m sure that awk could have done this with a little $(NF-1) magic or something like that.

The headache-inducing stuff

All since my netbook broke down, I’ve thought about two things: restoring the netbook/replacing it, and how to create some form of backup infrastructure which should be better than what I have in place today.

As for the backups, the “system” I have today is couple of USB-disks which I at times plug in and sync files to. That and most of my projects and config-files are in various git repositories all synced to the laptop/server-in-the-wardrobe which I made sure to backup after the netbook died, especially since the laptop/server disk is much older than the netbook disk was.

Another thing which bothers me with the current solution is that I have no off-site storage. And that would be nice to have. Belt AND suspenders of course, and off-site storage comes with its own set of problems such as trust in the offsite storage maintainer.

I think the solution will take the shape of a GNU+Linux box and Unison and possibly aided by incron. Not sure yet, will have to think more about it.

There are some other requirements which I have just barely scratched the surface of or not even begun thinking about yet, for instance it would be nice to be able to backup my parents stuff as well on a regular basis as to keep their stuff safer as well.

And as for the netbook, although it was a nice little machine, the keyboard was getting a bit worn out, and at times it was rather underpowered with its single core 1.6GHz atom processor, so the direction I am looking in now is towards something like this.

The stuff screwing over society

Now there’s truly no way in hell I’ll ever use Skype again.

Nothing new under the sun I guess, but it lends credibility to the Skype quip above.

This sure is some level-A grade retarded society we are constructing for ourselves…

Samsung Galaxy S3: The first smartphone designed entirely by lawyers, a great read about a truly depressing matter which probably is closer to the truth than we imagine. On the other hand, my personal opinion is that the midnight blue version looks pretty damn sweet.

SaaS and other crap where someone else is in control sure is a honking good idea, isn’t? Well, I guess it is if you’re the one in control, but I guess you won’t ever get my business…

The cool stuff

And I also managed to find some posts which touched the hacker in me, such as this post about how one could go about generating pseudo-random numbers (don’t use the algorithms, just be inspired by them) or how this guy started shaving bytes off of his “hello, world!” binary.

I immediately thought about FSCONS when I read this, and I didn’t feel at all worried about people thinking the same about our conf :)

Until the other day, when I read about its inclusion into git, I’d never even heard about git subtree, but this post makes a compelling case for looking into it.

I also came across a, to me, new data structure: the XOR linked list. Now, it has a couple of drawbacks, and I don’t think I’ll find much use for it, ever, but as a concept it is a very interesting idea, and just goes to show that XOR is frakking awesome.

I thought this was a pretty cool thing.

While I don’t have any problems with my ISP hijacking DNS requests right now, it is nice to know for posterity that there are ways around it ;)

If you are going to use JSON, and need comments, this seems like a reasonable way to go about it.

While I haven’t decided what I think about Go I really liked this blog post on how to create a grass mowing agent which derives the most optimal way to cut the digital grass in a simulated world.

Hopefully I ain’t the only one who finds this hilarious ;)

This is actually quite neat: Instead of adding “lorem ipsum” paragraphs all over your design, tweak the word list in the script, include it in the mockup, and markup all places which need filler content. Done.

In the latest issue of DatorMagaZin there was an article about FUSE which caught my eye, and having read the article my interest was piqued, so I just had to go look at the list myself, and truly, have you seen all the cool filesystems people have come up with? Frakkin’ awesome!

The food for thought stuff

Oh yeah, finally remember to treat everyone the way you’d like people to treat your own mother

:wq

2012w16

Sunday, April 22nd, 2012

I ought to dedicate this blog post to git and rsync: The hard drive on my netbook died this week. I haven’t attempted to recover anything from the disk yet, but of that which is most important I figure I haven’t lost anything at all. And that’s due in no small part to git and rsync.

All of my configuration files, at least those I care about, had been added to a git repository. And most of the binaries I wanted to preserve had been rsynced to my server.
Not all of it though, which is a shame, but it shouldn’t be hard to replace what I’ve lost. Especially if I can get the old hard drive to function just one more time, just long enough to at least make a list of what it is I’m missing. The rest of the disk, well, it’s spring, perhaps a spring cleaning was in order.

So all is not lost, and looking beyond this setback, I did learn some other things this week (except for the fact that I need to become better at performing backups) such as:

Also, quite some time ago, I went around thinking about how to automatically track my working time, and while this isn’t exactly like what I had in mind (I would probably just have created a daemon which somehow fetched the window title of the currently active window from X, and did so randomly 6 times per hour (not deterministically enough to be able to cheat the system).

And some assorted links which may or may not be of any particular use for anyone:

:wq

2012w11

Sunday, March 18th, 2012

This week has been filled with all sorts of fun and challenging stuff.

For one, I used Wireshark to (successfully) diagnose a problem for the first time :D

The problem was an overly restrictive iptables rule on the system I was trying to connect to, but boy did it feel good to identify and solve that problem on my own.

I also managed to squeeze in time to write scripts to two work buddies so that they didn’t need to perform overly repetitive and very error-prone tasks by hand. The one script even needed a little bit of Expect-scripting, which I’ve been aching to hack some more.

I also found out about vim‘s :e # (to try it out, open a file in vim, then :e someOtherFile followed by :e #)

I found a very pedagogic explanation about how quicksort works, which made me start thinking and wondering about algorithms in general again, even to the point of investigating quicksort further.

I also found this post which makes a fair point: IFF you are going to rely on a web service (in other words, a SaaS you are probably better off getting hooked up with one charging money for it.

Not that I could ever conscionable recommend anyone using a SaaS as this is bound to lock you into dependence of that provider, but sure, I get that some (most?) would rather throw money at it than learning (learning is scary, and you don’t have the time right?) to set up your own service.

Furthermore, I can’t really decide whether the author is being disingenuous or illiterate in naming this stance an “anti-free-software movement”. It is unclear if s/he meant “anti-gratis-software movement” or if s/he is actually feeling threatened by free software. Had there been a comment field on that “blog” I probably would have spent the two minutes required to ask, but since there isn’t one, I won’t bother, and on pure principle, if I ever need a bookmarking-service, I’ll just make sure to stay clear of that one, just in case s/he actually was taking a jab against free software.

Yes, I am petty and vindictive at times, shit happens.

Whilst toying with the idea of modifying my homepage a bit, a site wide change, I realized that it might make a lot of sense to rewrite it so that it is, if not template-based, at least modularized. But I guess I’ll continue thinking about that before making any changes.

A funny thing I just thought of out of the blue the other day was that with some sites, like LinkedIn and probably Facebook and others, there are options for giving these services your email account username and password, so that they could log in, check your contact list, and hook you up with other people you know.

But I am pretty sure that most email providers license agreements state (no, I haven’t checked, but it would be foolish of these mail providers not to) that it would be a violation of said agreement for the user to disclose their account password to anyone else.

Then again, I don’t really understand people who would use those tools, but I guess there are even more people who wouldn’t understand why I chose not to…

A very interesting read about the Batman and the Joker. Those who know me can probably guess what character I voted for.

I’ve also been thinking about the prospect of storing binaries in some sort of version control, mostly because I have a friend who is into game development/modding, and doing so without version control. And that has bitten him in the ass more than once now.

And since I am nowadays a git convert I naturally started looking there, and found this, which lead me, among other places, here. Haven’t tried it yet, but it is definitively an interesting idea.

And now that I have begun working with Wireshark, tcpdump seems to be a good next step.

Finally, yet another reason why the patent industry needs to change.

:wq

2012w08

Sunday, February 26th, 2012

Hacks

A capture the flag game where the objective is to break into a computer system.

Commandline

I found myself needing to remove a couple (three) columns from a file containing about 15 columnts per line. And sure, I could have done something like awk '{ print $1 " " $2 " " $3 " " }' for the 12 columns I wanted, but that would have been tedious.

There just had to be a better way. And of course there was ;)

* * * * * *

I’ve been entertaining an idea which would need version controlled updates, and they’d also need to be trusted. So I’d need signed commits, and since I’m mostly using git nowadays, I needed to find out if this was possible. It is.

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Since starting my new job I’ve realized just how important it can be to write portable scripts (especially echo has bitten me in the ass a couple of times already) so this post was pretty useful to me.

Society

Now this was a pretty inspiring post.

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A pretty funny post about how truly sorry a state the TV is in.