Posts Tagged ‘EU’

2012w39

Sunday, September 30th, 2012

The bad

EU is hard at work making a complete ass of itself… again… further reading

The good

California passes groundbreaking open textbook legislation :D

The unsorted thoughtful and/or cool

Pretty cool idea although probably not very useful for anything ;D

The lack of a good manual to explain both a) how it works, b) what it will actually install and where (and if it will set up services or not), c) and how I would actually operate it once installed, are the things (i.e., all results of lacking the necessary documentation for me to read up on BEFORE trying it) which keep me from even considering installing and testing prophet. Which is a real shame as it sounds like an interesting project.

Yet another nifty AWK tutorial

I just heard about Dancer, which seems to be to Perl, what Flask is to Python

:wq

2012w26

Tuesday, July 3rd, 2012

Last week (yeah I know, this post is a little late) was pretty stressed out with a looming deadline but not-at-all-that-late on Friday afternoon, everything came together and all my assigned test cases had been executed, yay! :D

The depressing stuff (a.k.a “:(“)

A study has concluded that the “Non-Practicing Entities” formerly known as patent trolls costs money, a whole lot of money… who’d have guessed? …

 

And facebook did yet again what any popular service for which the “users” doesn’t pay a dime; changed their service without any warning, bu giving every “user” a facebook.com email address and making it the default contact email.

It sure smells a lot like the “Man-in-the-Middle” attack the previously linked to, outraged, post makes it out to be.

Then again, I can’t really understand how people can still get outraged by any of the shit facebook does. And its not like there aren’t other reasons for wanting out. Coincidentally, masses of people abandoning fb might be the only way to get them to stop frakking around with the “users” so much.

(And yes, I have consistently marked users up using quotes, because as Andrew Lewis so eloquently put it: If you’re not paying for something, you’re not the customer, you’re the product being sold.)

 

Former United States President Jimmy Carter thinks that the US is “abandoning its role as the global champion of human rights”. Not sure if that is really news to anyone, but I guess it gets a little more weight when it comes from a former President who also so happens to have won the Nobel Peace Price (then again, so did Obama, for “not being Bush” so maybe that isn’t all that impressive…)

 

And more corruption and subverting of the public good going on while the USTR and MPAA plans what I suppose to become the next ACTA (i.e. developed in secret without any chance for criticism), the TPP.

And while on the subject of ACTA, the EU commissioner wants the European Parliament to fall in line (I guess it is bad PR to always have the EU look divided… too frakking bad…)

 

If you are an Apple user, and you are using Orbitz to book hotels, please be aware that if you just boot into Windows for a quickie to do the bookings, you may save a buck or two

 

The more I think about it, the more I feel that no matter what the IETF decides, web servers (coughApache*cough*nginx*cough*LightHTTPd*cough*) should just go right ahead and implement HTTP Error Code 451 anyway. Pretty sure I will make a point to be able to serve such a response if I ever dabble with web-apps again anyhow. Because people getting angry with ISPs, which are just following the law, is fruitless. If people instead direct their anger towards the people guilty of the poor laws (i.e. politicians deep in the pockets of certain four-letter-acronym organizations, most of which having headquarters in the US) I imagine things could begin to change.

(Yes, that would mean having to vote for someone else and potentially get screwed over (depending on your political views and what you believe to be the “right” way to conduct a society) in other pieces of policy)

 

I get her point. Seems kindof hopeless, damned if you do, damned if you don’t :(

The funnier stuff (a.k.a “:D”)

Pontus showed me a cool SSH shell called ZSSH with built-in capability to transfer files, within the shell. Yes, I know of scp, but I also know what a pain in the ass it is with one-time-logins.

 

A cool (perhaps not very useful, but very visually pleasing) tool is gource. It parses version control commits, and presents them visually (see PHP, Python, OpenOffice.org, or why not MySQL for visuals)

 

Want to make Python and Erlang talk to eachother, try Erlport.

 

Finally, while I was working at Gnutiken, I had the good fortune of sitting next to Andreas Nilsson, and I know I say this about a lot of my friends, but he’s one of the nicest guy I know (I guess I have truly lucked out with my friends), but there’s one thing where he and I don’t see eye to eye.

As a designer, user interface/experience wizard etc. his stance is that the concept of files in a computer must be eradicated from the user experience.

I disagree, and this post goes a way better job at explaining my thoughts than I would ever had been able to.

:wq

2012w14

Sunday, April 8th, 2012

Not a whole lot to say this week, it has mostly been work, sleep, work, sleep, … well you get the picture.

Some noteworthy things however:

Just how, in their infinite wisdom, does the EU expect to test the security of their own servers and services if they are going to outlaw so-called “cyber-attack tools”. For that matter, how do they propose ANY manufacturer of ANY type of digital system perform ANY type of actual security testing worth a damn?

Social AND Private? Well… not quite yet, but if they get the p2p and encryption stuff working, then we’re in business :)

ENCRYPT ALL THE THINGS! ;)

And it wouldn’t be one of my hallmark blagposts if it didn’t have some random links which may or may not be of any value, no would it?

Dunno just what it might be useful for, but creating 3D graphics procedurally using Lua, like with Fugu seems like just the right approach for me. If I were to do 3D models that is.

Now this promises to be an interesting game.

And a rather interesting programming language.

:wq

My day

Wednesday, May 20th, 2009

The two wortwhile things I’ve done today, in chronological order:

  1. Cheer up a dear friend who needed some kind words
  2. Vote for the Pirate Party in the EU election

The future of the Internet

Tuesday, March 24th, 2009

I have on and off during the last year or so read various articles on the Internet, about what our “dear” politicians have in store for the Internet. The first article I read mentioned some large corporations in the US wanting to restrict access and chop up the net into smaller parts, and bring in an analogy from the television-world. Websites would essentially become “channels”, and you could “buy” a package of channels, customized to what you would wish to read/watch/experience.

Oh, you’re a media-type, well then you’d probably appreciate the “media package”, containing sites such as YouTube and MySpace. “News?” you say, well we have the “news package” including CNN.com and Fox, perhaps the always levelheaded and informative *snicker* Aftonbladet for the Swedish readers.

You would have “pay-per-view”, online. Somehow I have a feeling that blogging-sites such as WordPress would either “mysteriously disappear” or, as they would now be “channels” and thus regulated, be watered down heavily moderated sites, where only the “right” opinions could be expressed.

And individual blog-installations, much like this one? I have no idea. I can’t see this blog making it to any “prime-time” feed, and I cannot see how, if access is reglated to only “approved” sites, how I would even maintain it anymore.

Today I found my way onto another blog (in Swedish), and sure maybe I am an alarmist, but I have seen these words formulated before, and now hearing them come from the EU, well let’s just say that I feel less than amused.

There is just one thing I can’t really understand how they would solve. I don’t have any great insight into the business world, but even the small warehouse I worked at a couple of ago used EDI to send weights, volumes and addresses of all pallets and packages to the freighter ahead of time. With a locked-down Internet, how the hell will any of this work? Not to mention all the banks (at least here in Sweden) which are closing down more and more of their local offices since so many people are doing their banking affairs online instead. Personally I’d rather not “just wait and see”. But then again, that’s why Christian Engström is going to get my vote in the EU election roughly two months from now. (Oh and I am SO going to make up for my mistake in 2006 by giving the pirate party my vote in 2010)