Archive for the ‘Society’ Category

2012w34

Sunday, August 26th, 2012

Society

Note to self: Never give United Airlines any of my business.

Control, or lack thereof

Steve Wozniak sees trouble in the cloud (that makes two of us) and doesn’t think that the Internet should have gatekeepers or regulators.

This hacker news thread contains a quote which perfectly sums up one aspect of what I feel is wrong with SAAS: SAAS means you’re vulnerable to vendor change with every pageload.

Privacy

Sociability’s value comes from privacy An essay by Kyro Beshay, via Cory Doctorow.

It is a poor grade upon humanity that sites like this need even exist.

Olympics and corporate greed

The Olympic games this year really made capitalism show its ugliest sides:

Case in point: VISA. Did they really think that hassling non-VISA-card holders would make them any new friends?

Case in point: London Olympics committee. I am not completely unreasonable, I understand that if too many people set up their own wireless hot-spots in close proximity to the “sanctioned” hot-spots, and on the same frequencies, bad things will happen, but at the same time I can’t shake the feeling that they just wanted a monopoly on providing connectivity, and forcing people to pay through the nose for it.

Good intentions and the road to hell

I understand the benefit to first responders, if we allowed for a government-controlled “emergency switch” to open up wireless routers for mesh-use in disaster areas, many people on Twitter recommended the inhabitants of Oslo to do just that after the attack, but I see the very real potential for abuse from the same government and since they get to define what is or isn’t an emergency, and when things are in people’s and society’s best interests, I give this idea a “thumbs down”-grade.

Drawing the wrong lessons from horrific events

Abuse of power

Case in point: VISA

DHS issuing take-down notices No free speech for you!

Security

A tutorial about off-the-record messaging courtesy of monkeyiq

Albeit not being anywhere near ready for primetime, cryptosphere still looks like a really interesting project

I am unsure as to whether Burner, the service which provides temporary phone numbers, will have a net positive or negative impact on society at large (if it has any impact at all). The concept is cool, and perhaps can be useful in certain settings, while it could probably be abused in others.

And I feel much the same way about Deadman. It could probably be awesome for hiking trips and the likes, for when you really don’t want to be disturbed, but if something were to happen it would be nice if emergency services knew roughly where to look.

Schneier on Security: $200 for a Fake Security System And as one commenter said: It’s all fun and games until your cat dies of exhaustion.

Development

The Best Programming Advice I Ever Got, a rather refreshing thought, it probably would be good to make ourselves a little less dependent on tools and have that grey matter exercise some more.

A jQuery extension called labelfor to associate labels with form input elements.

I’ve written before about this game, but I keep thinking about it and always forgetting what it’s called, so just a reminder to myself.
More than that however, is that I’ve also started taking an interest in Ren’Py the framework on which don’t take it personally, babe, it just ain’t your story is built.
I think that could be used in a plethora of ways, both for entertainment, but also education, if not both at once.

The shell

A blog post about steps to take to improve the performance of shell scripts. Really nice.

SSH

SSH forced commands pretty useful stuff.

Sorting on multiple columns

One of the previous weeks I needed to sort a bunch of lines, but I had concluded that it would be way too much work to transpose the columns in the file in a way that sort would magically work.

Which meant I needed to dig into the flags sort support. I was fairly certain that what I wanted done could be done, I just had to find the way. man sort got old real quick, so I hit duckduckgo instead and found this post which gave me everything I needed, and in a nicely formatted way :)

I can’t remember the actual data I needed sorting, but his example of sorting IP addresses was what helped me, specifically -k 2,2n -k4,4n (i.e. numeric sort by column 2 first, then by column 4)

Vim, autocmd and context-aware file headers

I don’t know when I picked it up, or from where (probably pesa’s Vim config, but for some time I’ve been using a filetype.vim file, in the root of my .vim directory, the contents of which is a bunch of lines, looking something like this:

au! BufRead,BufNewFile *.sh setfiletype sh
au! BufNewFile *.sh so ~/.vim/templates/sh_header

And this works like a charm, every new script I start writing on will get a shebang automatically inserted at the beginning of the file.

I never thought about what else one could do with these autocommands though, until I stumbled over a reddit thread, which pointed me here.

If you look into step 2, you will see that the autocmds there does not only read a header into the new file, but also modifies dates etc.

That’s actually pretty sweet.

Data mirroring

Using duplicity as a stateful rsync

Git stuff

A whole bunch of (git) ignore-files for use in various projects

And uet another git feature I feel I really need to learn ;)

Misc

As this video will tell you it is pretty darn hard to understand the scales of stuff like planets. The video does however make a pretty good attempt at visualizing it.

In the past I have linked to a post which wasn’t all that impressed with the idea of hiding the concept of files from users, and here’s another post, this one not particularly impressed with hiding the concept of directories from the users.
For my part, I consider this to be pure idiocracy

Depending on how well executed it ends up being (in my case, light weight has precedence) reditr could be enormously useful.

I have been eyeing dwb as a potential firefox replacement. We’ll see what happens.

Syntactic parses text, and try to build an “understanding” about words, and how they fit together.

The Future is not Real-Time. Put that way, I too really hope it isn’t ;)

2012w29

Sunday, July 22nd, 2012
Copyright

So apparently just looking at an (web)article of a newspaper (or any web page containing copyrighted content) could mean you are infringing on that publishers copyright… do newspapers actually want to commit that kind of suicide?

I couldn’t decide whether to put this post under “Copyright” or “Censorship” since it involves the MAFIAA using the DMCA to silence things… in this particular case, it would seem, their members own marketing campaigns… With friends like the MAFIAA, who need enemies? :)

Patents

Portable electronic device, method, and graphical user interface for displaying electronic lists and documents now, how could this not apply to every type smartphone, pad, dumb-phone or, for that matter, laptop, in existence? How can such a patent even be granted?

Censorship

Censored by copyright for protesting being censored by copyright, somehow I don’t think that this was how laws were intended to be used when humanity first came up with the concept of rule of law…

Who would have thought that filtering the net may affect more than the specific group targeted by the filter? That’s impossible right?

Surveillance

Facebook is being creepy as hell as usual.

Apparently, Microsoft’s SkyDrive comes with some strings attached

Society

The European Commission intends to make open access all research findings funded by Horizon 2020. This is nice :)
Dunno if EC or UK was first, but UK is thinking along the same lines.

On the other side of the spectrum, i.e. not so nice, if things really are as dire as President Obama would have people believe, wouldn’t the responsible thing to do then, be to secure the infrastructure the hell up, instead of passing laws which any would-be imaginary-or-real terrorist would ignore?

I mean, one of the most idiotic plots in “24” was that nuclear power plants could be remote controlled over the internet. Or in Die Hard 4, that with a couple of taps on a keyboard, the bad guy could redirect a whole bunch of gas to go to the same place at the same time, building pressure, making big badaboom…

Now, if the infrastructure in fact support doing this, remotely, then those who put that in the specification, and those who produced it, and those who installed it, should all be found and tried for dangerously criminal negligence.

Of course, if the end game is to hollow out personal privacy and spy on your own citizens, then it would be better to nibble away on their rights through more new and ineffective laws, which can always be extended later when proven (through a real enemy, someone just being curious, or a false flag operation) not to work.

Justice Department sues telco for daring to challenge its secret demands for private information.

Activism

Targeting Shell with a fake PR campaign. I wonder how long it will be until lobbyists have bought an amendment to some law labeling this sort of activism as terrorism…

Join the Internet Defense League and make sure the internet never loses. Ever. Or, put another way, Rescue the lolcats from the evil clutches of the internet hate league!

Services

Blooie lets you chat online with people who like what you like I am just a tad bit sceptical about this one…

On the one hand, getting in touch with people who like what I like, Free Software, Programming, vim, etc. etc. Great! Buuuuut, how is this not willfully and intentionally putting yourself inside a filter bubble, and only exposing yourself for the types of opinions you yourself already hold? If two people say the same thing, isn’t one of them redundant? I remain a little unconvinced.

Command line

At work this week I needed to get a file from server1 to server3, and the only connection between the two was through an intermediary server, server2. Oh yeah, the only way to communicate between the servers where ssh. Sure, a three step approach was possible (scp file server2: ; ssh server2; scp file server3: ) but the file on server1 could get updated at times, which would mean yet another upload, so a simpler process was needed, a shell script with something along the lines of this:

cat $file | ssh user@server2 "ssh user@server3 \"cat > $file\""

Thanks go to pesa for coming up with the solution.

Programs

TMSU is a program which allows you to tag your files, and then perform queries on the tags, filtering out all files not tagged according to the queried constraints. Neat!

ownCloud is getting more interesting with every passing day.

I never really thought about the fact that you could do lots of things with locate such as adding flags, or configuring directories or files to disregard.

I found an expect-like utility named empty. Funnily enough I found it by checking out the examples of the Zenity fork: Yad.

Cuttlefish: Execute actions when specific events are triggered.

I am also currently trying out this vim statusline.

Throught this question I learnt about fold.

Development

Really nice ELI5 article about how flood fill works, using Zombies and Cats, and Python.

Reading this post and seeing the example resume I agree that what catmoon ponders about would be pretty cool.

Of course, the program should know what skills I have, and only select the relevant out of that set, based on the skills extracted from the job listings. At least that’s how I’d design it, as there is no good reason to lie about what you know and don’t know.

And now I finally grasp how two create quines!

When you screw up, and commit sensitive data to a git repository, this seems like a rather good way to handle it.
Oh and of course, if that sensitive data was a password, CONSIDER THE PASSWORD COMPROMISED AND CHANGE IT!

I had heard about the “Rosetta Code” before, but never got around to checking it out until this weekend, which is when I found this rather intriguing piece of Perl code.

I have to admit to being rather impressed about what one can do with html/css/javascript and some javascript libraries these days.

And although very cool, I still have yet to find a personal use for PhantomJS :/

Text books used in education should be written like this.

Other news

RasPies can now be ordered in bulk.

Here’s to the misfits.

Dunno what it’s good for, but it is pretty.

Stochastic, nerdtastic restaurant bill splitting.

Astronomy Picture of the Day har a pretty sweet image this week.

:wq

2012w28

Sunday, July 15th, 2012

This week just flew by like a chinchilla with a rocket strapped to its back, but I managed to squeeze in some good laughs and some programming so all in all not too shabby week at all.

Glenn Greenwald: How America’s surveillance state breeds conformity and fear A rather long text (likely due to it being a transcript of a speech) but none the less both fascinating and horrifying at the same time.

And Russia doesn’t seem to fare much better, as Russian Wikipedia goes on strike over censorship plans

(Please note that I’m not trying to single anyone out, I don’t believe for a second that Europe or Sweden is one bit better than their neighbours)

I found a rather depressing thread on reddit where the OP works for a research organization and they have just received a job from the US Gov to carry out a questionnaire (with apparently very directed and leading questions) with the perceived objective to make Americans answer that they are ok with the government collecting data, since, if you can just get statistics saying that others find it ok, you can get the masses on board with the idea as well… Also related: push polls

This is a textbook case of why anonymity still has a place in the world. There were no malice involved here. This was an accident, but if it hurts even one of the outed persons that’s still enough. And that’s why databases, unnecessary or not, should be kept to the bare minimum. Because databases will always leak.

It’s possible that some of the people whose identities were revealed in the email could face workplace sanctions for opposing ACTA (I know a lot of people in the entertainment industry who privately oppose many of their employers’ initiatives), so revealing their identities is a potential big deal.

This ties back to surveillance states breeding conformity (and fear, but in this case the fear of retaliation already existed) because fearing sanctions people may stop speaking up, leading to other people, hesitant, undecided, to think that there must be nothing wrong since no one is speaking up. Conformity.

Although we can always trust in Falkvinge to come up with sensationalist blog posts, in this case I fear he might be right on the money.

With Facebook scanning chats for potentially illegal activities, I wonder how they would react if someone wrote a facebook app which encrypted the conversations between people (preferably through a javascript so the communication is encrypted browser to browser).

I found a fairly decent guide to regular expressions (the only thing which would make it better was if it wasn’t a “cookbook recipes” kind of post, but instead a “learn regular expressions with examples” type of post. But the recipes are broken down into parts and explained and that is really nice, and that’s why I’m mentioning it. A for effort :)

A post about vim completions which I should take to heart and start using more than I already am.

And if you have a non-technical friend who wishes to understand more about UNIXy systems, but would get information overload by non-abstracted techno-babble, my suggestion would be to direct them to Unixmages.

I happened to do something stupid in vim the other day, I pressed C^s, and I think I pressed it believing it would save the contents… C^s in a terminal doesn’t save anything… It will however suspend scrolling (I guess scroll-lock is the most aptly named description) but for all intents and purposes, this the first time it happened to me, I thought the terminal had frozen and I ended up running an xkill on that terminal window.

Today I thought I’d investigate it a little further, and upon doing so I realized that it is an intended feature which could even work at bootup, which I will certainly test the next time I’m booting the system and seeing some weird error message flash by.

Oh, and to “restore” the terminal, make it responsive again, C^wC^q is your friend.

Finally, a vim story which isn’t exactly my story, but close enough that I recognize myself in there :)

Update: Thanks pesa for pointing out the typo, C^q is the correct one
:wq

2012w27

Sunday, July 8th, 2012

Slow week, but I guess that is the way it’s supposed to be when on vacation :)

I guess I won’t EVER be buying a product from Cisco or Linksys again, as they obviously cannot be trusted (yes I know they backtracked on that, but the fact that they thought it was a good idea to begin with says all I need to know…)
And I should really take this as a sign that it is high time to flash my old trusty WRT-54GL to something freedom-respecting…

So, uh, you might want to fix this gaping security hole before you start flying drones hijacked kamikaze-devices over your own people. Just a thought…

Cryptowars… again? Really?

Thunderbird ISN’T dead, but that doesn’t mean I shouldn’t try to get my thumb out of my ass and learn to use mutt anyway.

UK seems to be getting more spy laws but with the right mix of software you can ward off most assaults on your privacy.

And while on the subject of privacy: This post makes a rather good case for privacy.

2012w26

Tuesday, July 3rd, 2012

Last week (yeah I know, this post is a little late) was pretty stressed out with a looming deadline but not-at-all-that-late on Friday afternoon, everything came together and all my assigned test cases had been executed, yay! :D

The depressing stuff (a.k.a “:(“)

A study has concluded that the “Non-Practicing Entities” formerly known as patent trolls costs money, a whole lot of money… who’d have guessed? …

 

And facebook did yet again what any popular service for which the “users” doesn’t pay a dime; changed their service without any warning, bu giving every “user” a facebook.com email address and making it the default contact email.

It sure smells a lot like the “Man-in-the-Middle” attack the previously linked to, outraged, post makes it out to be.

Then again, I can’t really understand how people can still get outraged by any of the shit facebook does. And its not like there aren’t other reasons for wanting out. Coincidentally, masses of people abandoning fb might be the only way to get them to stop frakking around with the “users” so much.

(And yes, I have consistently marked users up using quotes, because as Andrew Lewis so eloquently put it: If you’re not paying for something, you’re not the customer, you’re the product being sold.)

 

Former United States President Jimmy Carter thinks that the US is “abandoning its role as the global champion of human rights”. Not sure if that is really news to anyone, but I guess it gets a little more weight when it comes from a former President who also so happens to have won the Nobel Peace Price (then again, so did Obama, for “not being Bush” so maybe that isn’t all that impressive…)

 

And more corruption and subverting of the public good going on while the USTR and MPAA plans what I suppose to become the next ACTA (i.e. developed in secret without any chance for criticism), the TPP.

And while on the subject of ACTA, the EU commissioner wants the European Parliament to fall in line (I guess it is bad PR to always have the EU look divided… too frakking bad…)

 

If you are an Apple user, and you are using Orbitz to book hotels, please be aware that if you just boot into Windows for a quickie to do the bookings, you may save a buck or two

 

The more I think about it, the more I feel that no matter what the IETF decides, web servers (coughApache*cough*nginx*cough*LightHTTPd*cough*) should just go right ahead and implement HTTP Error Code 451 anyway. Pretty sure I will make a point to be able to serve such a response if I ever dabble with web-apps again anyhow. Because people getting angry with ISPs, which are just following the law, is fruitless. If people instead direct their anger towards the people guilty of the poor laws (i.e. politicians deep in the pockets of certain four-letter-acronym organizations, most of which having headquarters in the US) I imagine things could begin to change.

(Yes, that would mean having to vote for someone else and potentially get screwed over (depending on your political views and what you believe to be the “right” way to conduct a society) in other pieces of policy)

 

I get her point. Seems kindof hopeless, damned if you do, damned if you don’t :(

The funnier stuff (a.k.a “:D”)

Pontus showed me a cool SSH shell called ZSSH with built-in capability to transfer files, within the shell. Yes, I know of scp, but I also know what a pain in the ass it is with one-time-logins.

 

A cool (perhaps not very useful, but very visually pleasing) tool is gource. It parses version control commits, and presents them visually (see PHP, Python, OpenOffice.org, or why not MySQL for visuals)

 

Want to make Python and Erlang talk to eachother, try Erlport.

 

Finally, while I was working at Gnutiken, I had the good fortune of sitting next to Andreas Nilsson, and I know I say this about a lot of my friends, but he’s one of the nicest guy I know (I guess I have truly lucked out with my friends), but there’s one thing where he and I don’t see eye to eye.

As a designer, user interface/experience wizard etc. his stance is that the concept of files in a computer must be eradicated from the user experience.

I disagree, and this post goes a way better job at explaining my thoughts than I would ever had been able to.

:wq

2012w25

Sunday, June 24th, 2012

Quite a while since I wrote a post now, I’ve not been sick or anything, but there has been a lot of work abound, and outside work I prioritized sleeping over writing. But now I’m back for the moment, so let’s get down to business :)

Since last time I’ve come up with new ways of abusing awk, such as having it find the highest value from a command outputting in the following syntax:

\t<characters, integers, fullstop>: <integer>\n

To make it a little more different, the command also spits out a header, as well as an additional newline after the end of output.

I just now, while writing this, came up with a different solution, which doesn’t use awk:

theCommand | grep -v '^[^ \t]\+' | tr -d ' ' | cut -d':' -f2 | sort -r | head -n 1

but what I ended up using was:

theCommand | awk 'BEGIN { highest = 0 } $0 ~ /^[ \t]/ { if ( $2 > highest ) { highest = $2 } } END { print highest }'

In this case, from what I can gather, awk is the more efficient solution. One process versus five.

Update: As Werner points out, the if statement isn’t really necessary (which also makes it possible to cut out the BEGIN statement as well):

theCommand | awk '/^[^ \t]/ && $2 > highest { highest = $2 } END { printf "%d\n", highest }'

Utilities

  • ditaa (a.k.a DIagrams Through Ascii Art) makes it easy to generate nice-looking diagram images from… rather nice-looking ASCII diagrams
  • docopt, a command-line interface description language, which also seems to support generating the parser for the CLI being described
  • Peity for generating different types of charts using jQuery and <canvas>
  • Ghost.py interacting with web pages, programmatically

As of late I have been thinking a great deal about backups and the project which seems the most interesting to me is Duplicity.

Random tech stuff

Other random not-so-techy stuff

What I pass for humour

:wq

2012w18

Sunday, May 6th, 2012

The scripty stuff

This week I finally managed to crack a problem I’d been trying to solve for a couple of weeks, namely how to only print the foobar errors, and the ensuing stack trace of these errors from a logfile:

awk 'BEGIN { section = 0 } /foobar/ { section = 1; print; next } /^[A-Z]/ && section == 1 { section = 0; next } section == 1 { print; next }' logfile 

Looking at the solution, I am kindof ashamed that it took me that long to get a workable solution…

I also found this neat little oneliner in a comment on reddit: echo "something long and space separated of which you want the last word" | rev | cut -d ' ' -f 1 | rev. Then again, I’m sure that awk could have done this with a little $(NF-1) magic or something like that.

The headache-inducing stuff

All since my netbook broke down, I’ve thought about two things: restoring the netbook/replacing it, and how to create some form of backup infrastructure which should be better than what I have in place today.

As for the backups, the “system” I have today is couple of USB-disks which I at times plug in and sync files to. That and most of my projects and config-files are in various git repositories all synced to the laptop/server-in-the-wardrobe which I made sure to backup after the netbook died, especially since the laptop/server disk is much older than the netbook disk was.

Another thing which bothers me with the current solution is that I have no off-site storage. And that would be nice to have. Belt AND suspenders of course, and off-site storage comes with its own set of problems such as trust in the offsite storage maintainer.

I think the solution will take the shape of a GNU+Linux box and Unison and possibly aided by incron. Not sure yet, will have to think more about it.

There are some other requirements which I have just barely scratched the surface of or not even begun thinking about yet, for instance it would be nice to be able to backup my parents stuff as well on a regular basis as to keep their stuff safer as well.

And as for the netbook, although it was a nice little machine, the keyboard was getting a bit worn out, and at times it was rather underpowered with its single core 1.6GHz atom processor, so the direction I am looking in now is towards something like this.

The stuff screwing over society

Now there’s truly no way in hell I’ll ever use Skype again.

Nothing new under the sun I guess, but it lends credibility to the Skype quip above.

This sure is some level-A grade retarded society we are constructing for ourselves…

Samsung Galaxy S3: The first smartphone designed entirely by lawyers, a great read about a truly depressing matter which probably is closer to the truth than we imagine. On the other hand, my personal opinion is that the midnight blue version looks pretty damn sweet.

SaaS and other crap where someone else is in control sure is a honking good idea, isn’t? Well, I guess it is if you’re the one in control, but I guess you won’t ever get my business…

The cool stuff

And I also managed to find some posts which touched the hacker in me, such as this post about how one could go about generating pseudo-random numbers (don’t use the algorithms, just be inspired by them) or how this guy started shaving bytes off of his “hello, world!” binary.

I immediately thought about FSCONS when I read this, and I didn’t feel at all worried about people thinking the same about our conf :)

Until the other day, when I read about its inclusion into git, I’d never even heard about git subtree, but this post makes a compelling case for looking into it.

I also came across a, to me, new data structure: the XOR linked list. Now, it has a couple of drawbacks, and I don’t think I’ll find much use for it, ever, but as a concept it is a very interesting idea, and just goes to show that XOR is frakking awesome.

I thought this was a pretty cool thing.

While I don’t have any problems with my ISP hijacking DNS requests right now, it is nice to know for posterity that there are ways around it ;)

If you are going to use JSON, and need comments, this seems like a reasonable way to go about it.

While I haven’t decided what I think about Go I really liked this blog post on how to create a grass mowing agent which derives the most optimal way to cut the digital grass in a simulated world.

Hopefully I ain’t the only one who finds this hilarious ;)

This is actually quite neat: Instead of adding “lorem ipsum” paragraphs all over your design, tweak the word list in the script, include it in the mockup, and markup all places which need filler content. Done.

In the latest issue of DatorMagaZin there was an article about FUSE which caught my eye, and having read the article my interest was piqued, so I just had to go look at the list myself, and truly, have you seen all the cool filesystems people have come up with? Frakkin’ awesome!

The food for thought stuff

Oh yeah, finally remember to treat everyone the way you’d like people to treat your own mother

:wq

2012w17

Sunday, April 29th, 2012

Now this was an uplifting read.

And I know that it is the popular thing to do, to hate on Ruby and Rails and that entire community, but seriously, what self-respecting person would want to identify themselves as a brogrammer? But, if I don’t consider myself a rock-star programmer, what then do I consider myself to be?

My first thoughts reading this post revolved around oh no, not another hare-brained “improvement” to something which doesn’t need changing. Then I thought some more, and saw how this could be useful. But then I had another thought.

Ordinary letters, you know, the pen and paper kind, has worked pretty well without being programmable, and I suppose that is because you probably tend to formulate these letters in a different way, thus circumventing the need to programmability. Just a thought…

The world needs more people like this.

The world needs less of this type of operations.

:wq

2012w16

Sunday, April 22nd, 2012

I ought to dedicate this blog post to git and rsync: The hard drive on my netbook died this week. I haven’t attempted to recover anything from the disk yet, but of that which is most important I figure I haven’t lost anything at all. And that’s due in no small part to git and rsync.

All of my configuration files, at least those I care about, had been added to a git repository. And most of the binaries I wanted to preserve had been rsynced to my server.
Not all of it though, which is a shame, but it shouldn’t be hard to replace what I’ve lost. Especially if I can get the old hard drive to function just one more time, just long enough to at least make a list of what it is I’m missing. The rest of the disk, well, it’s spring, perhaps a spring cleaning was in order.

So all is not lost, and looking beyond this setback, I did learn some other things this week (except for the fact that I need to become better at performing backups) such as:

Also, quite some time ago, I went around thinking about how to automatically track my working time, and while this isn’t exactly like what I had in mind (I would probably just have created a daemon which somehow fetched the window title of the currently active window from X, and did so randomly 6 times per hour (not deterministically enough to be able to cheat the system).

And some assorted links which may or may not be of any particular use for anyone:

:wq

2012w15

Sunday, April 15th, 2012

This has been a pretty rough week, but I guess there is nothing less to expect when deadlines are drawing near.

This week I found myself wanting to count all the occurrences of “foo”, but ONLY if they occurred BEFORE “bar”:

awk 'BEGIN { fooCount=0; stopCounting=0 } /bar/ { stopCounting=1 } /foo/ && stopCounting=0 { fooCount = fooCount + 1 } END { print fooCount }' <myfile>

And despite the quite hectic schedule, I did manage to help a colleague with a little scripting, and those are two things which almost always sets me in a better mood: scripting (problem solving), and helping others (of course, if I don’t manage to be of any help, that kindof defeats any positive mood change I get from scripting, but in this particular case it all worked out really well in the end) :)

And now for the mandatory collection of links from this week:

  • This must be a joke right? The US can’t really, for real, be irritated with Australia for preferring national service providers over American ones, right? Especially when it could come down to storing data about Australian citizens, or in other ways vital to the government. This has to be a joke right?
  • I wonder if this is something most programmers can relate to or if it’s just me
  • This post could have been written by me… well, not as articulate, but the spirit of it. What’s even more interesting is the response this triggered on HackerNews.
  • QArt Codes is where QR codes, Solomon-Reed error correction, some extra calculations and your imagination mix together ;)
  • Hilarious post making fun about certain governments and their want for even more snooping laws, especially about conducting surveillance in in-game chats…

:wq