2012w02

Update: Corrected link, thanks Ulf

This has been quite the busy week. Oodles and oodles of stuff happening, both nice and… less nice.

UEFI + SecureBoot

Microsoft up to no good again. Basically, on non-ARM systems Microsoft requires that a user can disable SecureBoot, but not on ARM systems (i.e. smartphones, tablets, and the upcoming ultrabooks). Anyone surprised?

Music Production

While I have no real interest in producing music myself—code and, to some extent, graphics have always come easier to me—I do have an interest in seeing tools like this come to GNU+Linux as well, since it means that’s one less category of creators not having the alternative to be creative in a free software environment :)

sshuttle

This project seems pretty cool, I haven’t tried it out yet, and the thing about uploading code to the server is something I’ll definitively look into before actually considering executing it, but all in all this looks like a pretty easy SSH tunneling/VPN mimicing proxy thingy solution which could be useful at times.

Especially if it means I can sit at an internet café or some such, and have all my traffic routed över SSH through my server at home, not having to worry about someone in that café sniffing it up.

tmux

I installed a local copy of tmux at work, and so far it has been a complement rather than a detriment to the way I work.

The one thing that I wasn’t pleased with at first, but which was trivially easy to fix, once I read a blogpost (also, don’t miss the second post), was that I wanted 11 shells all stacked on top / below eachother, with an even size (i.e. each should take up 1/11th of the tmux window height.

When splitting the window, to make room for another shell, it just divides the current shell height by two, and makes the one part the new shell, and the other part the old shell. For multiples of two I suppose this would work out fine, but with 11 shells?

So I went about it, and the tenth and eleventh shell were small.
But there are different preconfigured layouts, and you loop through them by repeatedly hitting the control sequence (I’ve mapped this to C^a) and space. One of those layouts proved to be just what I wanted :)

Raspberry Pi

Now this is a pretty cool project! For the condensed summary, read the wikipedia page. It is making the dream of a $100 computer a reality, and there are some pretty cool ideas already about how to put it to good use.

SOPA

Reddit doesn’t like SOPA, and Tim O’Reilly isn’t all that pleased either.

If you’re an Android user, and you don’t like SOPA either, there is an app for letting you know (by scanning barcodes) if a product is made by a pro-SOPA company so you can avoid supporting them.

There have been some advances which means that making a fuzz about it can pay off. Of course, it would be better to scrap those bills completely.

So, 2012-01-18 is still SOPA Blackout day and a whole lot of sites are participating, and you could join in as well (and if you want to join in, please be smart about it and host the javascript your own damn self so that the hosting server doesn’t go down… (which also means, get that javascript now, and not on tuesday evening when everyone else is going to try to get it))

Links

  • Privacy in social networks — not sure I understand how it is done, not sure that this implementation is optimal, but nice idea none the less
  • I read a post the other day, and the author of that post, while being in the right, just came off … I don’t know, but his post was a rant, and not the passionate kind, but the whiney kind, so I won’t be linking to his post, I have no wish to drive traffic to him. However, another person, with reasoning and values more aligned to my own, wrote a reaction post to his, which I feel was more constructive, and nicer, so here is the link to that post
  • Unfair advantages grow from irrational habits
  • Rikard tipped me off to a thoughtful TED talk video, which I liked alot, and through the speakers website I found, among others, this game—EVOKE—which seems to be pretty cool
  • I had the idea of building an image gallery a while ago, so when I came across this link I was a little interested in seeing how they’d approached it, but what I really took away from this site, is how much I liked their rather user-friendly step-by-step manual for getting it up and running
  • I wonder what he will create? :)
  • I don’t know if it’s just me, but non-flashy, low-requirements games make me all warm and fuzzy inside
  • I seem to recall that I wasn’t all that impressed with the unhosted project some time ago. This post (specifically the verification section) is exactly why I hesitate

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6 Responses to “2012w02”

  1. If you haven’t already, you should check out the other software by the author of sshuttle, Avery Pennarun, and also his blog.[1] He does some really neat stuff (although there’s been some silence since he got hired by Google). Perhaps my favorite is “redo”, a replacement for make based on some essays by djb.

    Also, I’m not so excited about Raspberry Pi; it requires a non-free driver/firmware. Though it’s a little farther away, Rhombus-Tech [2]. Notably, even the hardware specs are libre [3].

    [1] http://apenwarr.ca/log/
    [2] http://rhombus-tech.net/
    [3] http://git.rhombus-tech.net/

  2. Patrik says:

    Hey Luke :)

    I hadn’t checked out his other stuff, but will do so as soon as I’m done posting this reply, thank you :)

    And about Raspberry Pi, I didn’t know, but that is definitely a let down. Definitively good to know, so that I can in that case start promoting the better option :)

    Many thanks, as always :)
    /Patrik

  3. Ulf says:

    The URL for “non-flashy, low-requirements games” is wrong :)

  4. I have just discovered that the Rhombus-Tech A10 will also require a nonfree firmware for accelerated graphics.

  5. Patrik says:

    Thanks for noticing :)
    Great to see you here :)

  6. Patrik says:

    How sad :/
    But does that mean that non-accelerated graphics will work with free drivers?